gore


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Related to gore: Ogrish

gore 1

 (gôr)
tr.v. gored, gor·ing, gores
To pierce or stab with a horn or tusk.

[Middle English goren, probably from gore, spear, from Old English gār.]

gore 2

 (gôr)
n.
1. A triangular or tapering piece of cloth forming a part of something, as in a skirt or sail.
2. A small triangular piece of land.
tr.v. gored, gor·ing, gores
1. To provide with a gore.
2. To cut into a gore.

[Middle English, from Old English gāra, triangular piece of land.]

gore 3

 (gôr)
n.
Blood, especially coagulated blood from a wound.

[Middle English, filth, from Old English gor.]

gore

(ɡɔː)
n
1. blood shed from a wound, esp when coagulated
2. informal killing, fighting, etc
[Old English gor dirt; related to Old Norse gor half-digested food, Middle Low German göre, Dutch goor]

gore

(ɡɔː)
vb
(tr) (of an animal, such as a bull) to pierce or stab (a person or another animal) with a horn or tusk
[C16: probably from Old English gār spear]

gore

(ɡɔː)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a tapering or triangular piece of material used in making a shaped skirt, umbrella, etc
2. a similarly shaped piece, esp of land
vb
(Clothing & Fashion) (tr) to make into or with a gore or gores
[Old English gāra; related to Old Norse geiri gore, Old High German gēro]
gored adj

Gore

(ɡɔː)
n
(Biography) Al(bert) Jr. born 1948, US Democrat politician; vice president of the US (1993–2001); defeated in the disputed presidential election of 2000; leading environmental campaigner; shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel For Climate Change

gore1

(gɔr, goʊr)

n.
blood, esp. when clotted.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English gor dung, dirt, c. Middle Dutch goor, Old High German, Old Norse gor]

gore2

(gɔr, goʊr)

v.t. gored, gor•ing.
to pierce with or as if with a horn or tusk.
[1350–1400; Middle English; see gore3]

gore3

(gɔr, goʊr)

n., v. gored, gor•ing. n.
1. a triangular piece of material inserted in a garment, sail, etc., to give it a desired shape.
2. one of the panels, usu. tapered or shaped, making up a flaring skirt.
3. a triangular tract of land, esp. one lying between larger divisions.
v.t.
4. to make or furnish with a gore or gores.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English gāra corner, c. Old High German gēro, Old Norse geiri; compare Old English gār spear]

Gore

(gɔr, goʊr)
n.
Albert Arnold, Jr. (Al), born 1948, vice president of the U.S. 1993–2001.

gore


Past participle: gored
Gerund: goring

Imperative
gore
gore
Present
I gore
you gore
he/she/it gores
we gore
you gore
they gore
Preterite
I gored
you gored
he/she/it gored
we gored
you gored
they gored
Present Continuous
I am goring
you are goring
he/she/it is goring
we are goring
you are goring
they are goring
Present Perfect
I have gored
you have gored
he/she/it has gored
we have gored
you have gored
they have gored
Past Continuous
I was goring
you were goring
he/she/it was goring
we were goring
you were goring
they were goring
Past Perfect
I had gored
you had gored
he/she/it had gored
we had gored
you had gored
they had gored
Future
I will gore
you will gore
he/she/it will gore
we will gore
you will gore
they will gore
Future Perfect
I will have gored
you will have gored
he/she/it will have gored
we will have gored
you will have gored
they will have gored
Future Continuous
I will be goring
you will be goring
he/she/it will be goring
we will be goring
you will be goring
they will be goring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been goring
you have been goring
he/she/it has been goring
we have been goring
you have been goring
they have been goring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been goring
you will have been goring
he/she/it will have been goring
we will have been goring
you will have been goring
they will have been goring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been goring
you had been goring
he/she/it had been goring
we had been goring
you had been goring
they had been goring
Conditional
I would gore
you would gore
he/she/it would gore
we would gore
you would gore
they would gore
Past Conditional
I would have gored
you would have gored
he/she/it would have gored
we would have gored
you would have gored
they would have gored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gore - Vice President of the United States under Bill Clinton (born in 1948)
2.gore - coagulated blood from a wound
blood - the fluid (red in vertebrates) that is pumped through the body by the heart and contains plasma, blood cells, and platelets; "blood carries oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and carries away waste products"; "the ancients believed that blood was the seat of the emotions"
3.gore - a piece of cloth that is generally triangular or tapering; used in making garments or umbrellas or sails
full skirt - a long skirt gathered at the waist
gaiter - a shoe covering the ankle with elastic gores in the sides
piece of cloth, piece of material - a separate part consisting of fabric
umbrella - a lightweight handheld collapsible canopy
4.gore - the shedding of blood resulting in murder; "he avenged the bloodshed of his kinsmen"
murder, slaying, execution - unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
Verb1.gore - wound by piercing with a sharp or penetrating object or instrument
pierce, thrust - penetrate or cut through with a sharp instrument
2.gore - cut into gores; "gore a skirt"
tailor, cut - style and tailor in a certain fashion; "cut a dress"

gore

1
noun blood, slaughter, bloodshed, carnage, butchery video nasties full of blood and gore

gore

2
verb pierce, wound, stab, spit, transfix, impale He was gored to death by a rhinoceros.

gore

noun
The fluid circulated by the heart through the vascular system:
Translations
دَميَنطَح، يَثقُب أو يَجْرَحُ بقرنِهِ
nabrat na rohysedlá krev
stange
hurmeveri
alvadt vérmegsebesít
blóî, blóîlifrarreka í gegn
cruor
persmeigtisubadyti
asinissabadīt
nabrať na rohyzaschnutá krv
boynuzlayıp yaralamakpıhtılaşmış kansüsmek

gore

1 [gɔːʳ] N (= blood) → sangre f derramada

gore

2 [gɔːʳ] VT (= injure) → cornear

gore

[ˈgɔːr]
vt [bull] → encorner
to be gored → être blessé(e) d'un coup de corne
n (= blood) → sang m

gore

1
n (liter: = blood) → Blut nt

gore

2
vtaufspießen, durchbohren; gored to death by a bulldurch die Hörner eines Stiers tödlich verletzt

gore

3
n (= panel)Bahn f; (in sail) → Gehren m

gore

1 [gɔːʳ] nsangue m

gore

2 [gɔːʳ] vt (subj, bull) → incornare

gore

3 [gɔːʳ] n (of skirt) → godet m inv; (of umbrella) → spicchio

gore

(goː) noun
blood (especially when it is thick and solid). After the battle, the knight was covered in gore.
verb
(of an animal) to pierce with its horns, tusks etc. The bull gored the farmer to death.
ˈgory adjective
with a lot of blood or bloodshed. a gory battle; a gory tale.
References in classic literature ?
Gore had served Colonel Lloyd, in the capacity of overseer, upon one of the out-farms, and had shown himself worthy of the high station of overseer upon the home or Great House Farm.
Gore was a grave man, and, though a young man, he indulged in no jokes, said no funny words, seldom smiled.
Gore once undertook to whip one of Colonel Lloyd's slaves, by the name of Demby.
And it was vexatious that Lawyer Gore was not more like him, but was a bald, round-featured man, with bland manners and fat hands; a game-cock that you would be rash to bet upon against Wakem.
That must be why it is blindfolded, so that it shall not see the bull coming to gore it.
with mortal pangs The mimes become its food, And the angels sob at vermin fangs In human gore imbued.
There was no place where they could bathe; the whole of the river-bank was trampled by the cattle and open to the road; even walks were impossible, for the cattle strayed into the garden through a gap in the hedge, and there was one terrible bull, who bellowed, and therefore might be expected to gore somebody.
They couldn't 'welter in gore,' to save their lives
Rre Madisa a re go botlhokwa gore morafe o tlhaloganye ka melelwane ya dikomiti tsa ditlhabololo tsa motse le ya botlhophi e seng jalo ba tlaa tlhakatlhakanya melelwane ya dikgaolwana tsa botlhophi le ya dikomiti tsa ditlhabololo tsa metse.
Guggenheim jumped to his feet and waved Gore to get up with him as he bounded toward the stage.
Gore took nothing but grief for calling the internal combustion engine a "mortal threat" to human civilization that should be made obsolete in 25 years.