gorge


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gorge

 (gôrj)
n.
1. A deep narrow valley with steep rocky sides; a ravine.
2. A narrow entrance into the outwork of a fortification.
3. The throat; the gullet: The gory sight made my gorge rise.
4. The crop of a hawk.
5. An instance of gluttonous eating.
6. The contents of the stomach; something swallowed.
7. A mass obstructing a narrow passage: a shipping lane blocked by an ice gorge.
8. The seam on the front of a coat or jacket where the lapel and the collar are joined.
v. gorged, gorg·ing, gorg·es
v.tr.
1. To stuff with food; glut: gorged themselves with candy.
2. To devour greedily.
v.intr.
To eat gluttonously.

[Middle English, throat, from Old French, from Late Latin gurga, perhaps from Latin gurges, whirlpool, abyss.]

gorg′er n.

gorge

(ɡɔːdʒ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a deep ravine, esp one through which a river runs
2. (Anatomy) the contents of the stomach
3. feelings of disgust or resentment (esp in the phrase one's gorge rises)
4. an obstructing mass: an ice gorge.
5. (Fortifications) fortifications
a. a narrow rear entrance to a work
b. the narrow part of a bastion or outwork
6. (Anatomy) archaic the throat or gullet
vb
7. (Falconry) (intr) falconry (of hawks) to eat until the crop is completely full
8. to swallow (food) ravenously
9. (tr) to stuff (oneself) with food
[C14: from Old French gorger to stuff, from gorge throat, from Late Latin gurga, modification of Latin gurges whirlpool]
ˈgorgeable adj
ˈgorger n

gorge

(gɔrdʒ)

n., v. gorged, gorg•ing. n.
1. a narrow cleft with steep, rocky walls, esp. one through which a stream runs.
2. a small canyon.
3. a gluttonous meal.
4. something that is swallowed; contents of the stomach.
5. an obstructing mass: an ice gorge.
6. the seam where the lapel joins the collar of a coat.
7. the rear part of a bastion or similar outwork of a fortification.
8. a primitive type of fishhook consisting of a sharply pointed piece of bone, antler, etc., that is attached to a line and lodges in a fish's gills when swallowed.
9. the throat; gullet.
10. a feeling of strong disgust or anger: Their cruelty made his gorge rise.
v.t.
11. to stuff with food: to gorge oneself.
12. to swallow, esp. greedily.
13. to fill or choke up.
v.i.
14. to eat greedily.
[1325–75;< Old French gorger, derivative of gorge throat « Latin gurguliō gullet, gurges whirlpool, eddy]
gorg′er, n.

gorge

(gôrj)
A deep, narrow passage with steep sides, often with a stream flowing through it.

gorge


Past participle: gorged
Gerund: gorging

Imperative
gorge
gorge
Present
I gorge
you gorge
he/she/it gorges
we gorge
you gorge
they gorge
Preterite
I gorged
you gorged
he/she/it gorged
we gorged
you gorged
they gorged
Present Continuous
I am gorging
you are gorging
he/she/it is gorging
we are gorging
you are gorging
they are gorging
Present Perfect
I have gorged
you have gorged
he/she/it has gorged
we have gorged
you have gorged
they have gorged
Past Continuous
I was gorging
you were gorging
he/she/it was gorging
we were gorging
you were gorging
they were gorging
Past Perfect
I had gorged
you had gorged
he/she/it had gorged
we had gorged
you had gorged
they had gorged
Future
I will gorge
you will gorge
he/she/it will gorge
we will gorge
you will gorge
they will gorge
Future Perfect
I will have gorged
you will have gorged
he/she/it will have gorged
we will have gorged
you will have gorged
they will have gorged
Future Continuous
I will be gorging
you will be gorging
he/she/it will be gorging
we will be gorging
you will be gorging
they will be gorging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gorging
you have been gorging
he/she/it has been gorging
we have been gorging
you have been gorging
they have been gorging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gorging
you will have been gorging
he/she/it will have been gorging
we will have been gorging
you will have been gorging
they will have been gorging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gorging
you had been gorging
he/she/it had been gorging
we had been gorging
you had been gorging
they had been gorging
Conditional
I would gorge
you would gorge
he/she/it would gorge
we would gorge
you would gorge
they would gorge
Past Conditional
I would have gorged
you would have gorged
he/she/it would have gorged
we would have gorged
you would have gorged
they would have gorged

gorge


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A deep, narrow, steep-sided valley, formed where a river erodes the floor far faster than the sides.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gorge - a deep ravine (usually with a river running through it)gorge - a deep ravine (usually with a river running through it)
flume, gulch - a narrow gorge with a stream running through it
ravine - a deep narrow steep-sided valley (especially one formed by running water)
2.gorge - a narrow pass (especially one between mountains)gorge - a narrow pass (especially one between mountains)
mountain pass, notch, pass - the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks; "we got through the pass before it started to snow"
3.gorge - the passage between the pharynx and the stomachgorge - the passage between the pharynx and the stomach
passageway, passage - a path or channel or duct through or along which something may pass; "the nasal passages"
muscle system, muscular structure, musculature - the muscular system of an organism
alimentary canal, alimentary tract, digestive tract, digestive tube, gastrointestinal tract, GI tract - tubular passage of mucous membrane and muscle extending about 8.3 meters from mouth to anus; functions in digestion and elimination
epicardia - the short part of the esophagus extending downward from the diaphragm to the stomach
cardiac sphincter - the valve between the distal end of the esophagus and the stomach; the physiological sphincter at the esophagogastric junction
Verb1.gorge - overeat or eat immodestlygorge - overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself; "She stuffed herself at the dinner"; "The kids binged on ice cream"
eat - eat a meal; take a meal; "We did not eat until 10 P.M. because there were so many phone calls"; "I didn't eat yet, so I gladly accept your invitation"

gorge

noun
1. ravine, canyon, pass, clough (dialect), chasm, cleft, fissure, defile, gulch a steep path into Crete's Samaria Gorge
verb
1. overeat, bolt, devour, gobble, wolf, swallow, gulp, guzzle, pig out (slang) I could spend all day gorging on chocolate.
2. (usually reflexive) stuff, fill, feed, cram, glut, surfeit, satiate, sate Three men were gorging themselves on grouse and watermelon.

gorge

verb
To satisfy to the full or to excess:
Translations
مَضيق بين جَبَلَينيأكُل بِنَهَم وشراهَه
roklenacpat se
kløft
ahmiahotkiakuilukurkkukuru
bezabálszurdok
gljúfurháma í sig
apsirytiprisiryti
aizapierīties
pass
sarp vaditıka basa yemek

gorge

[gɔːdʒ]
A. N
1. (Geog) → cañón m, barranco m
2. (Anat) → garganta f
my gorge rises at itme da asco
B. VT to gorge o.satracarse (with, on de)
C. VIatracarse (on de)

gorge

[ˈgɔːrdʒ]
ngorge f
vt
to gorge o.s. → se gaver
to gorge o.s. on sth → se gaver de qch

gorge

n
(Geog) → Schlucht f
(old: = gullet) → Schlund m; it stuck in my gorge to … (fig)es war mir zuwider, zu …; it makes my gorge rise (fig: = makes me angry) → dabei kommt mir die Galle hoch
vrschlemmen, sich vollessen; (animal)gierig fressen, schlingen; to gorge (oneself) on something (also fig)etw in sich (acc)hineinschlingen, etw verschlingen
vt they were gorgedsie hatten sich reichlich gesättigt (→ on an +dat); (animals)sie hatten sich vollgefressen (→ on an +dat)

gorge

[gɔːdʒ]
1. n (Geog, Anat) → gola
2. vt to gorge o.s. (with or on)rimpinzarsi (di), ingozzarsi (di)

gorge

(goːdʒ) noun
a deep narrow valley. A river ran along the bottom of the gorge.
verb
to eat greedily until one is full. He gorged himself on fruit at the party.
References in classic literature ?
More than once the trail fairly hung on the edge of some almost bottomless gorge, and again it wound its way between great walls of rock, so poised that they appeared about to topple over and crush the travelers.
The half a dozen cabins scattered along the banks of the North Fork, as if by some overflow of that capricious river, had become augmented during a week of fierce excitement by twenty or thirty others, that were huddled together on the narrow gorge of Devil's Spur, or cast up on its steep sides.
And even if he for ever flies within the gorge, that gorge is in the mountains; so that even in his lowest swoop the mountain eagle is still higher than other birds upon the plain, even though they soar.
I have carried him thousands and thousands of miles on scout duty for the army, and there's not a gorge, nor a pass, nor a valley, nor a fort, nor a trading post, nor a buffalo-range in the whole sweep of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains that we don't know as well as we know the bugle-calls.
Heidelberg lies at the mouth of a narrow gorge--a gorge the shape of a shepherd's crook; if one looks up it he perceives that it is about straight, for a mile and a half, then makes a sharp curve to the right and disappears.
They'll bleat and baa, dona like goats, Gorge down black sheep, and strain at motes, Array their backs in fine black coats, Then seize their negroes by their throats, And choke, for heavenly union.
I traced the white road winding round the base of one mountain, and vanishing in a gorge between two; how I longed to follow it farther
The bases of the mountains forming the gorge in which the little village lay, were richly green; and high above this gentler vegetation, grew forests of dark fir, cleaving the wintry snow-drift, wedge-like, and stemming the avalanche.
He was through, he stood upon the bank shaking the water from him like a dog, and now he was away up the narrow gorge of stones to the long slope, running low as his wolves ran.
Full gorge and a deep sleep to you, Rann," cried Bagheera.
But chance arranged matters better than he expected or hoped, for at that very moment, in a gorge on the mountain that opened where they stood, the youth he wished to find made his appearance, coming along talking to himself in a way that would have been unintelligible near at hand, much more at a distance.
I had passed through a narrow, overhanging gorge just before entering suddenly upon this table land, and the sight which met my eyes filled me with consternation and dismay.