gorse


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Related to gorse: Common Gorse

gorse

 (gôrs)
n.
Any of several spiny evergreen shrubs of the genus Ulex of the pea family, especially U. europaeus, native to Europe and naturalized elsewhere, having fragrant yellow flowers and black pods. Also called furze, whin1.

[Middle English gorst, gors, from Old English.]

gorse

(ɡɔːs)
n
(Plants) any evergreen shrub of the leguminous genus Ulex, esp the European species U. europeaus, which has yellow flowers and thick green spines instead of leaves. Also called: furze or whin
[Old English gors; related to Old Irish garb rough, Latin horrēre to bristle, Old High German gersta barley, Greek khēr hedgehog]
ˈgorsy adj

gorse

(gɔrs)

n.
any spiny European evergreen shrub of the genus Ulex, of the legume family, having rudimentary leaves and yellow flowers. Also called furze.
[before 900; Middle English gorst, Old English; akin to Old High German gersta, Latin hordeum barley]
gors′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gorse - very spiny and dense evergreen shrub with fragrant golden-yellow flowersgorse - very spiny and dense evergreen shrub with fragrant golden-yellow flowers; common throughout western Europe
genus Ulex, Ulex - genus of Eurasian spiny shrubs: gorse
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Translations

gorse

[gɔːs] Naulaga f, tojo m

gorse

[ˈgɔːrs] najoncs mplgorse bush najonc m

gorse

nStechginster m; gorse bushStechginsterstrauch m

gorse

[gɔːs] nginestrone m
References in classic literature ?
Nor it isn't fields nor mountains, it's just miles and miles and miles of wild land that nothing grows on but heather and gorse and broom, and nothing lives on but wild ponies and sheep.
The moors were purple with heather, touched here and there with the fire of the flaming gorse, the wind blew always from the west, the gardens were ablaze with slowly bursting rhododendrons.
In the afternoon he walked about the common; and that is gray and dingy too; it is neither country nor town; the gorse is stunted; and all about is the litter of civilisation.
He had risen to his feet and was standing with his back to the cedar-tree, looking away with fixed eyes to where the sunlight fell upon a distant hillside gorgeous with patches and streaks of yellow gorse and purple heather.
The heath was covered with golden patches of flowering gorse, gleaming magnificently in the light of the bright spring sunshine.
A rainy night had been followed by a glorious morning, and the heath-covered countryside, with the glowing clumps of flowering gorse, seemed all the more beautiful to eyes which were weary of the duns and drabs and slate grays of London.
Blindly we ran through the gloom, blundering against boulders, forcing our way through gorse bushes, panting up hills and rushing down slopes, heading always in the direction whence those dreadful sounds had come.
On the other side lay a strip of vineyard, and beyond it the desolate and sandy region of the Landes, all tangled with faded gorse and heath and broom, stretching away in unbroken gloom to the blue hills which lay low upon the furthest sky-line.
Th largest bush in the island (belonging to the family of Compositae) is scarcely so tall as our gorse.
As I said, the Great Western now runs right through it, and it is a land of large, rich pastures bounded by ox-fences, and covered with fine hedgerow timber, with here and there a nice little gorse or spinney, where abideth poor Charley, having no other cover to which to betake himself for miles and miles, when pushed out some fine November morning by the old Berkshire.
That dark expanse was lit in patches by yellow gorse and broom; there was no red weed to be seen, and as I prowled, hesitating, on the verge of the open, the sun rose, flooding it all with light and vitality.
They ordered the lackeys not to unsaddle the gorses, and to hold themselves in readiness to set off again immediately.