gossip

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Related to gossipers: rumourmonger

gos·sip

 (gŏs′əp)
n.
1. Rumor or talk of a personal, sensational, or intimate nature.
2. A person who habitually spreads intimate or private rumors or facts.
3. Trivial, chatty talk or writing.
4. A close friend or companion.
5. Chiefly British A godparent.
intr.v. gos·siped, gos·sip·ing, gos·sips
To engage in or spread gossip: gossiped about the neighbors.

[Middle English godsib, gossip, godparent, from Old English godsibb : god, god; see god + sibb, kinsman; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

gos′sip·er n.
gos′sip·ry n.
gos′sip·y adj.

gossip

(ˈɡɒsɪp)
n
1. casual and idle chat: to have a gossip with a friend.
2. a conversation involving malicious chatter or rumours about other people: a gossip about the neighbours.
3. Also called: gossipmonger a person who habitually talks about others, esp maliciously
4. light easy communication: to write a letter full of gossip.
5. archaic a close woman friend
vb, -sips, -siping or -siped
(often foll by: about) to talk casually or maliciously (about other people)
[Old English godsibb godparent, from god + sib; the term came to be applied to familiar friends, esp a woman's female friends at the birth of a child, hence a person, esp a woman, fond of light talk]
ˈgossiper, ˈgossipper n
ˈgossiping n, adj
ˈgossipingly adv
ˈgossipy adj

gos•sip

(ˈgɒs əp)

n., v. -siped -sipped, -sip•ing -sip•ping. n.
1. idle talk or rumor, esp. about the private affairs of others.
2. light, familiar talk or writing.
3. Also, gos′sip•er, gos′sip•per. a person given to tattling or idle talk.
4. Archaic. a friend, esp. a woman.
v.i.
5. to talk idly, esp. about others.
[before 1050; < Old English godsibb, orig. godparent =god God + sibb related; see sib]
gos′sip•y, adj.

Gossip

 
  1. [News in the computer industry] as rife with rumor as the C.I.A. or the National Security Council —Erik Sandberg-Diment, New York Times, January 25, 1987
  2. Collected them [rumors] as a child might collect matchbooks —W. P. Kinsella
  3. Confirmed gossips are like connoisseurs of cheese; the stuff they relish must be stout —Holman Day
  4. Delivered more gossip than the National Enquirer —Joseph Wambaugh
  5. Far and wide the tale was told, like a snowball growing while it rolled —John Greenleaf Whittier
  6. Fond of gossip as an old woman —Ivan Turgenev
  7. An indiscreet man is like an unsealed letter, everybody can read it —Sebastian Shamfort
  8. Little words of speculation drone like bees in a bottle —Beryl Markham
  9. News as roaring in the air like a flight of bees —Truman Capote
  10. News … would have run like a pistol shot through Faithful House [the name of publishing business around which Swinnerton’s novel, Faithful Company, centers] —Frank Swinnerton
  11. Rumor … it had gone like a fire in dry grass —William Faulkner

    See Also: SPREADING

  12. Rumors [on Iranian arms scandal’s effect on Washington] are spreading like lava from a volcano —Senator Robert Byrd, CBS-TV news program, broadcast December 5th
  13. Rumors began to thicken like a terrible blizzard —Susan Fromberg Schaeffer
  14. Rumors … flew like birds out of the unknown —Stephen Crane
  15. Rumors swirled around his name like the waters in a riptide —Peter De Vries
  16. Rumors that rush around … inflating as they go, like giant balloons until somebody comes along to prick them —Vita Sackville-West
  17. Scandal, like a kite, to fly well, depends greatly on the length of the tale it has to carry —Punch, 1854
  18. A secret in his [the gossip’s] mouth is like a wild bird put into a cage; whose door no sooner opens, but it is out —Ben Jonson
  19. Spits out secrets like hot custard —Thomas Fuller
  20. Stories, like dragons, are hard to kill … If the snake does not, the tale runs still —John Greenleaf Whittier
  21. Tale-bearers are as bad as the talemakers —Richard Brinsley Sheridan
  22. Tell tales out of school like a child —Honoré de Balzac
  23. They come together like the coroner’s inquest, to sit upon the murdered reputations of the week —William Congreve
  24. They [a talkative family] fly around with news in their beaks like blue jays —Susan Fromberg Schaeffer
  25. Traded in gossip the way grown-ups play the stock market —Nora Johnson This comparison by the teen-aged narrator in The World of Henry Orient would be equally apt without the reference to age.
  26. Trumpeting it [a secret] … like an elephant in heat —William Alfred
  27. The United States government leaks like a rusty tin can —David Brinkley, “This Week With David Brinkley,” ABC-TV, November 16, 1986
  28. Word gets around..it’s like jungle drums —George Axelrod
  29. Word of scandal spreads like a spot of oil —Marcel Proust

gossip


Past participle: gossiped
Gerund: gossiping

Imperative
gossip
gossip
Present
I gossip
you gossip
he/she/it gossips
we gossip
you gossip
they gossip
Preterite
I gossiped
you gossiped
he/she/it gossiped
we gossiped
you gossiped
they gossiped
Present Continuous
I am gossiping
you are gossiping
he/she/it is gossiping
we are gossiping
you are gossiping
they are gossiping
Present Perfect
I have gossiped
you have gossiped
he/she/it has gossiped
we have gossiped
you have gossiped
they have gossiped
Past Continuous
I was gossiping
you were gossiping
he/she/it was gossiping
we were gossiping
you were gossiping
they were gossiping
Past Perfect
I had gossiped
you had gossiped
he/she/it had gossiped
we had gossiped
you had gossiped
they had gossiped
Future
I will gossip
you will gossip
he/she/it will gossip
we will gossip
you will gossip
they will gossip
Future Perfect
I will have gossiped
you will have gossiped
he/she/it will have gossiped
we will have gossiped
you will have gossiped
they will have gossiped
Future Continuous
I will be gossiping
you will be gossiping
he/she/it will be gossiping
we will be gossiping
you will be gossiping
they will be gossiping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gossiping
you have been gossiping
he/she/it has been gossiping
we have been gossiping
you have been gossiping
they have been gossiping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gossiping
you will have been gossiping
he/she/it will have been gossiping
we will have been gossiping
you will have been gossiping
they will have been gossiping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gossiping
you had been gossiping
he/she/it had been gossiping
we had been gossiping
you had been gossiping
they had been gossiping
Conditional
I would gossip
you would gossip
he/she/it would gossip
we would gossip
you would gossip
they would gossip
Past Conditional
I would have gossiped
you would have gossiped
he/she/it would have gossiped
we would have gossiped
you would have gossiped
they would have gossiped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gossip - light informal conversation for social occasionsgossip - light informal conversation for social occasions
chat, confab, confabulation, schmoose, schmooze - an informal conversation
2.gossip - a report (often malicious) about the behavior of other people; "the divorce caused much gossip"
report, account - the act of informing by verbal report; "he heard reports that they were causing trouble"; "by all accounts they were a happy couple"
earful - an outpouring of gossip
hearsay, rumor, rumour - gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth
grapevine, pipeline, word of mouth - gossip spread by spoken communication; "the news of their affair was spread by word of mouth"
malicious gossip, scandal, dirt - disgraceful gossip about the private lives of other people
talk of the town, talk - idle gossip or rumor; "there has been talk about you lately"
3.gossip - a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others
communicator - a person who communicates with others
cat - a spiteful woman gossip; "what a cat she is!"
scandalmonger - a person who spreads malicious gossip
blabbermouth, talebearer, taleteller, tattler, tattletale, telltale - someone who gossips indiscreetly
yenta - (Yiddish) a woman who talks too much; a gossip unable to keep a secret; a woman who spreads rumors and scandal
Verb1.gossip - wag one's tongue; speak about others and reveal secrets or intimacies; "She won't dish the dirt"
talk, speak - exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words"
bruit, rumor, rumour - tell or spread rumors; "It was rumored that the next president would be a woman"
2.gossip - talk socially without exchanging too much informationgossip - talk socially without exchanging too much information; "the men were sitting in the cafe and shooting the breeze"
converse, discourse - carry on a conversation
jawbone, schmoose, schmooze, shmoose, shmooze - talk idly or casually and in a friendly way

gossip

noun
1. idle talk, scandal, hearsay, tittle-tattle, buzz, dirt (U.S. slang), jaw (slang), gen (Brit. informal), small talk, chitchat, blether, scuttlebutt (U.S. slang), chinwag (Brit. informal) There has been a lot of gossip about the reasons for his absence. a magazine packed with celebrity gossip
2. busybody, babbler, prattler, chatterbox (informal), blether, chatterer, scandalmonger, gossipmonger She was a vicious old gossip.
verb
1. chat, chatter, blather, schmooze (slang), jaw (slang), dish the dirt (informal), blether, shoot the breeze (slang, chiefly U.S.), chew the fat or rag (slang) We gossiped well into the night.
Quotations
"There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about" [Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray]
"Gossip is a sort of smoke that comes from the dirty tobacco-pipes of those that diffuse it; it proves nothing but the bad taste of the smoker" [George Eliot Daniel Deronda]

gossip

noun
1. Idle, often sensational and groundless talk about others:
Slang: scuttlebutt.
2. A person habitually engaged in idle talk about others:
Slang: yenta.
verb
To engage in or spread gossip:
Translations
ثَرثَرَه، حديثقِيلٌ و قَالقيل وقالمُحِب للقيل والقاليثرثر، يتحدَّث عن الآخرين
drbyklábositklepnaklepyklevetit
sladdersladderkællingsladresludresludre med
klaĉo
juorujuoruta
לרכלרכילות
tračtračati
pletykapletykafészektereferél
kjaftaskjóîaslúîra, segja kjaftasöguslúîur, kjaftasagaslúîur, spjallspjalla, slúîra
うわさ話うわさ話をする
가십수군거리다
apkalbosaukštuomenės kronikaliežuvautiliežuvautojasliežuvingas
papļāpāšanapapļāpātpļāpapļāpastenkas
klebetiťklebetnicaporozprávanie saporozprávať sa
klepetatiklepetuljaopravljanjeopravljati
skvallerskvallra
การนินทานินทา
buôn chuyệnchuyện phiếm

gossip

[ˈgɒsɪp]
A. N
1. (= scandal, malicious stories) → cotilleo m, chismorreo m
2. (= chatter) → charla f
we had a good old gossipcharlamos un buen rato
3. (= person) → cotilla mf, chismoso/a m/f
B. VI
1. (= scandalmonger) → cotillear, chismorrear
2. (= chatter) → charlar
C. CPD gossip column Necos mpl de sociedad
gossip columnist, gossip writer Ncronista mf de sociedad

gossip

[ˈgɒsɪp]
n
(= talk) (in village, workplace, milieu)commérages mpl, cancans mpl
Tell me the gossip! → Raconte-moi les cancans !
gossip about sb → des commérages sur qn
There's been a lot of gossip about it → Il y a eu beaucoup de cancans là-dessus.
a piece of gossip → un ragot, un racontar
(= chat) → bavardages mpl
(= person) → commère f
She's such a gossip! → C'est une vraie commère!
vi
(= chat) → bavarder
They were always gossiping → Elles étaient tout le temps en train de bavarder.
to gossip with sb → bavarder avec qn
to gossip about sb → cancaner sur qn, faire des commérages sur qn
They gossiped about her → Elles faisaient des commérages à son sujet.gossip column néchos mplgossip columnist néchotier/ière m/f

gossip

n
Klatsch m, → Tratsch m (inf); (= chat)Schwatz m; to have a gossip with somebodymit jdm schwatzen or plauschen (inf)or klönen (N Ger); it started a lot of gossipes gab Anlass zu vielem Gerede or Tratsch (inf)or Klatsch; office gossipBürotratsch m (inf)
(= person)Klatschbase f
vischwatzen, plauschen (inf), → klönen (N Ger); (maliciously) → klatschen, tratschen (inf)

gossip

:
gossip column
nKlatschkolumne or -spalte f
gossip columnist
nKlatschkolumnist(in) m(f)

gossip

:
gossipmonger
nKlatschmaul nt (inf)
gossipmongering
nKlatscherei f, → Tratscherei f (inf)

gossip

[ˈgɒsɪp]
1. n (talk) → chiacchiere fpl; (scandal) → pettegolezzi mpl; (person) → pettegolo/a, chiacchierone/a
a piece of gossip → un pettegolezzo
2. vi (talk) → chiacchierare
to gossip (about) (talk scandal) → fare pettegolezzi (su), chiacchierare (sul conto di)

gossip

(ˈgosip) noun
1. talk about other people's affairs, not always truthful. I never pay any attention to gossip.
2. a chat. She dropped in for a cup of coffee and a gossip.
3. a person who listens to and passes on gossip. She's a dreadful gossip.
verb
1. to pass on gossip.
2. to chat.
ˈgossipy adjective
fond of gossiping. gossipy neighbours.
gossip column
an article in a newspaper etc containing gossip about famous people.

gossip

قِيلٌ و قَال, يَنْهَمِكُ في القِيلِ والقَال drby, klábosit sladder, sludre med Klatsch, schwatzen κουτσομπολεύω, κουτσομπολιό chisme, chismorrear, cotillear, cotilleo juoru, juoruta cancaner, ragot trač, tračati pettegolezzo, spettegolare うわさ話, うわさ話をする 가십, 수군거리다 roddelen, roddeltje sladder, sladre oplotkować, plotka fofoca, fofocar сплетничать, сплетня skvaller, skvallra การนินทา, นินทา dedikodu, dedikodu yapmak buôn chuyện, chuyện phiếm 说闲话, 闲话
References in classic literature ?
Negroes are tireless gossipers, which, of course, is but a roundabout way of saying that they are human.
We are not tired of the endless processions of cheerful, chattering gossipers that throng these courts and streets all day long, either; nor of the coarse-robed monks; nor of the "Asti" wines, which that old doctor
There were not many subjects of dispute which at that moment could have come home to his own breast more powerfully, for having the unknown uppermost in his thoughts, it naturally occurred to him that he would have done just the same if any audacious gossiper durst have presumed in his hearing to speak lightly of her.
LITERARY -- Mexican politics, 2020: Backstabbers, schemers, and gossipers.
When I rise I sing over my ox, gossipers disperse I am like my forefathers I rise to be seen by my ancient fathers I rise to be seen walking with pride As it was in the distant past When our clan was born.
Rather than simply representing criticism of the gossipers, given the negative depictions of Temple as a "bad" girl, the black cat has a double meaning, which includes a crude slang allusion to Temple's "dark sexuality"--her "black pussy"--an image of Temple's racialized sexuality.
T HE gossipers love to talk about an O'Brien-Wachman rivalry in the same way they have waffled on for years about Wachman moving to England, or anywhere else.
Announces Quarterly Conference Call CGTH008 10/05/2006 10:00 r f IL-Verizon-Kankakee (SCHAUMBURG) Wireless Phone Users in Kankakee County Now Experience Even Clearer Reception and Fewer Dropped Calls CGTH017A 10/05/2006 10:00 r f TX-AT&T-Blue-Room (SAN ANTONIO) AT&T Unites Jocks, Musicians, Gamers and Gossipers With New AT&T Blue Room Content Hub CLTH002 10/05/2006 10:00 r f FL-Modis-status-award (JACKSONVILLE) Modis Awarded Contract Vendor Status by Virginia's State Capital DATH002A 10/05/2006 10:00 r f TX-ATERAS-report (DALLAS) ATERAS Partners With AberdeenGroup to Sponsor 'The Legacy Application Modernization Benchmark Report' DCTH029 10/05/2006 10:00 r f DC-Blackboard-Q3-call (WASHINGTON) Blackboard Inc.
So, too, the narrator's observation of the liveried servants ("See the gold hat-bands too, and other gorgeous trimmings, on those glossy groups of low-voiced gossipers near by" [Piazza Tales 304]) suggests the increasing array of retainers working for the new metropolitan aristocracy, some of whom had reintroduced the undemocratic practice of putting them in livery.
Musicians are great gossipers and we have a lot of memories.