gourd


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to gourd: gourd family

gourd

 (gôrd, go͝ord)
n.
1. Any of several trailing or climbing cucurbit plants bearing fruits with a hard rind, especially Lagenaria siceraria and a variety of Cucurbita pepo.
2.
a. The fruit of such a plant, sometimes of unusual shape or color.
b. The dried and hollowed-out shell of one of these fruits, often used as a container or as a decorative object.
Idiom:
off/out of (one's) gourd Slang
Very foolish; crazy.

[Middle English gourde, from Anglo-Norman, ultimately from Latin cucurbita.]

gourd

(ɡʊəd)
n
1. (Plants) the fruit of any of various cucurbitaceous or similar plants, esp the bottle gourd and some squashes, whose dried shells are used for ornament, drinking cups, etc
2. (Plants) any plant that bears this fruit. See also sour gourd, dishcloth gourd, calabash
3. (Plants) a bottle or flask made from the dried shell of the bottle gourd
4. (Ceramics) a small bottle shaped like a gourd
[C14: from Old French gourde, ultimately from Latin cucurbita]
ˈgourdˌlike adj
ˈgourd-ˌshaped adj

gourd

(gɔrd, goʊrd, gʊərd)

n.
1. the hard-shelled fruit of any plant belonging to the gourd family, esp. of the genus Cucurbita, made into bowls, ladles, etc.
2. a plant bearing such a fruit.
3. a dried and excavated gourd shell used as a bottle, dipper, flask, etc.
Idioms:
out of or off one's gourd, Slang. out of one's mind; crazy.
[1275–1325; Middle English gourd(e), courde < Anglo-French (Old French cöorde) < Latin cucurbita]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gourd - bottle made from the dried shell of a bottle gourdgourd - bottle made from the dried shell of a bottle gourd
bottle - a glass or plastic vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids; typically cylindrical without handles and with a narrow neck that can be plugged or capped
2.gourd - any of numerous inedible fruits with hard rinds
calabash - round gourd of the calabash tree
fruit - the ripened reproductive body of a seed plant
3.gourd - any vine of the family Cucurbitaceae that bears fruits with hard rindsgourd - any vine of the family Cucurbitaceae that bears fruits with hard rinds
Cucurbitaceae, family Cucurbitaceae, gourd family - a family of herbaceous vines (such as cucumber or melon or squash or pumpkin)
buffalo gourd, calabazilla, Cucurbita foetidissima, Missouri gourd, prairie gourd vine, wild pumpkin, prairie gourd - perennial vine of dry parts of central and southwestern United States and Mexico having small hard mottled green inedible fruit
melon vine, melon - any of various fruit of cucurbitaceous vines including: muskmelons; watermelons; cantaloupes; cucumbers
Ecballium elaterium, exploding cucumber, squirting cucumber, touch-me-not - Mediterranean vine having oblong fruit that when ripe expels its seeds and juice violently when touched
bottle gourd, Lagenaria siceraria, calabash - Old World climbing plant with hard-shelled bottle-shaped gourds as fruits
balsam apple, Momordica balsamina - a tropical Old World flowering vine with red or orange warty fruit
balsam pear, Momordica charantia - tropical Old World vine with yellow-orange fruit
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Translations
يَقْطين، قَرع
tykev
græskar
kaalikalebassi
dísztök
grasker
ヒョウタン瓢箪
moliūgas
ķirbis
kalebassskalle
su kabağısukabağı

gourd

[gʊəd] Ncalabaza f

gourd

[ˈgɔːrd ˈgʊərd] ngourde f, calebasse f

gourd

nFlaschenkürbis m; (dried) → Kürbisflasche f

gourd

[gʊəd] nzucca

gourd

(guəd) , ((American) go:rd) noun
a type of large fruit, or the plant on which it grows.
References in classic literature ?
That while he tendered to Alice the gourd of sweet water, and the venison in a trencher, neatly carved from the knot of the pepperidge, with sufficient courtesy, in performing the same offices to her sister, his dark eye lingered on her rich, speaking countenance.
The woman, who was very handsome, waited till my mother had finished her angry words; then she looked up and spoke slowly, "There is a cow by you with milk dropping from its udder; will you not even give me and my boy a gourd of milk?
ADAM, earths hallowd mould, Of God inspir'd, small store will serve, where store, All seasons, ripe for use hangs on the stalk; Save what by frugal storing firmness gains To nourish, and superfluous moist consumes: But I will haste and from each bough and break, Each Plant & juciest Gourd will pluck such choice To entertain our Angel guest, as hee Beholding shall confess that here on Earth God hath dispenst his bounties as in Heav'n.
she was as a crown of green palms to my grey locks; and she must wither in a night, like the gourd of Jonah
When it was full I left it propped in the fork of a tree, and a few days later, carrying the hateful old man that way, I snatched at my gourd as I passed it and had the satisfaction of a draught of excellent wine so good and refreshing that I even forgot my detestable burden, and began to sing and caper.
If your worship would like a drop, sound though warm, I have a gourd here full of the best, and some scraps of Tronchon cheese that will serve as a provocative and wakener of your thirst if so be it is asleep.
held a gourd full of rum to his mouth; while the third, an old sailer, at once the pilot and captain, looked on with that egotistical pity men feel for a misfortune that they have escaped yesterday, and which may overtake them to-morrow.
The Gond said nothing, but picked up a trail of the Karela, the vine that bears the bitter wild gourd, and laced it to and fro across the temple door in the face of the staring red Hindu image.
Tis said that when The hands of men Tamed this primeval wood, And hoary trees with groans of woe, Like warriors by an unknown foe, Were in their strength subdued, The virgin Earth Gave instant birth To springs that ne'er did flow That in the sun Did rivulets run, And all around rare flowers did blow The wild rose pale Perfumed the gale And the queenly lily adown the dale(Whom the sun and the dew And the winds did woo), With the gourd and the grape luxuriant grew.
With great difficulty, and by the promise of a present of a good hunting-knife each, I succeeded in persuading three wretched natives from the village to come with us for the first stage, twenty miles, and to carry a large gourd holding a gallon of water apiece.
She approached, without uttering a syllable, the victim who writhed in a vain effort to escape her, and detaching a gourd from her girdle, she raised it gently to the parched lips of the miserable man.
Tarzan had to lift him that he might drink from the gourd.