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 (go͝or-mänd′, go͝or′mənd)
1. A lover of good food.
2. A person who often eats too much.

[Middle English gourmant, glutton, from Old French gormant.]


(ˈɡʊəmənd; French ɡurmɑ̃) or


a person devoted to eating and drinking, esp to excess
[C15: from Old French gourmant, of uncertain origin]
ˈgourmandˌism n


(gʊərˈmɑnd, ˈgʊər mənd)

1. one who is fond of good eating, often to excess.
2. a gourmet; epicure.
[1400–50; < Old French gormant a glutton, of uncertain orig.]
gour′mand•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gourmand - a person who is devoted to eating and drinking to excessgourmand - a person who is devoted to eating and drinking to excess
eater, feeder - someone who consumes food for nourishment


[ˈgʊəmənd] Nglotón/ona m/f


nSchlemmer m, → Gourmand m


[ˈgʊəmənd] nbuona forchetta, ghiottone/a
References in classic literature ?
Look at your knife-handle, there, my civilized and enlightened gourmand dining off that roast beef, what is that handle made of?
Mademoiselle foresaw the moment when the viscount wanted bread; she watched his every look; when he turned his head she adroitly put upon his plate a portion of some dish he seemed to like; had he been a gourmand, she would almost have killed him; but what a delightful specimen of the attentions she would show to a husband
If I am to remain here permanently, as Monsieur Mazarin has kindly given me to understand, I must provide myself with a diversion for my old age, I must turn gourmand.
It was a yearning that the most cherished of children could never satisfy and as she watched Martin and Rose her position seemed to her to be that of a hungry pauper, brought to the table of a rich gourmand, there to look on helplessly while the other toyed carelessly with the precious morsels of which she was in such extreme need.
The general finished by informing him that Evgenie's uncle was head of one of the civil service departments, and rich, very rich, and a gourmand.
Vain and egotistical, supple and proud, libertine and gourmand, grasping from the pressure of debt, discreet as a tomb out of which nought issues to contradict the epitaph intended for the passer's eye, bold and fearless when soliciting, good-natured and witty in all acceptations of the word, a timely jester, full of tact, knowing how to compromise others by a glance or a nudge, shrinking from no mudhole, but gracefully leaping it, intrepid Voltairean, yet punctual at mass if a fashionable company could be met in Saint Thomas Aquinas,--such a man as this secretary- general resembled, in one way or another, all the mediocrities who form the kernel of the political world.
The young ladies did not drink it; Osborne did not like it; and the consequence was that Jos, that fat gourmand, drank up the whole contents of the bowl; and the consequence of his drinking up the whole contents of the bowl was a liveliness which at first was astonishing, and then became almost painful; for he talked and laughed so loud as to bring scores of listeners round the box, much to the confusion of the innocent party within it; and, volunteering to sing a song (which he did in that maudlin high key peculiar to gentlemen in an inebriated state), he almost drew away the audience who were gathered round the musicians in the gilt scollop-shell, and received from his hearers a great deal of applause.
If only I had been a glutton now, a club gourmand, but you see I can eat this.
Passepartout, who had been purchasing several dozen mangoes-- a fruit as large as good-sized apples, of a dark-brown colour outside and a bright red within, and whose white pulp, melting in the mouth, affords gourmands a delicious sensation--was waiting for them on deck.
It was a time of plenty in the camp; of prime hunters' dainties; of buffalo humps, and buffalo tongues; and roasted ribs, and broiled marrow-bones: all these were cooked in hunters' style; served up with a profusion known only on a plentiful hunting ground, and discussed with an appetite that would astonish the puny gourmands of the cities.
Just to think of a party of these unnatural gourmands taking it into their heads to make a convivial meal of a poor devil, who would have no means of escape or defence: however, there was no help for it.
The slimy disgusting Holuthuriae (allied to our star-fish), which the Chinese gourmands are so fond of, also feed largely, as I am informed by Dr.