governess

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gov·er·ness

 (gŭv′ər-nĭs)
n.
A woman employed to educate and train the children of a private household.

[Middle English governesse, short for governouresse, from Old French governeresse, feminine of governeor, governor, from Latin gubernātor; see gubernatorial.]

governess

(ˈɡʌvənɪs)
n
(Education) a woman teacher employed in a private household to teach and train the children

gov•ern•ess

(ˈgʌv ər nɪs)

n.
1. a woman employed in a private household to take charge of a child's upbringing and education.
2. Archaic. a woman who is a ruler or governor.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French]
gov′er•ness•y, adj.
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.governess - a woman entrusted with the care and supervision of a child (especially in a private home)governess - a woman entrusted with the care and supervision of a child (especially in a private home)
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching

governess

noun tutor, teacher He studied under the strict tutelage of his English governess.
Translations
guvernanta

governess

[ˈgʌvənɪs] Ninstitutriz f, gobernanta f

governess

[ˈgʌvərnəs] ngouvernante f

governess

nGouvernante f, → Hauslehrerin f

governess

[ˈgʌvnɪs] ngovernante f, istitutrice f
References in classic literature ?
Do you look upon governesses as creatures above suspicion or necessarily of moral perfection?
I have known several among the higher ranks who treated their governesses quite as one of the family; though some, I allow, are as insolent and exacting as any one else can be: for there are bad and good in all classes.
The unknown lady, in her reply, made no objection to this, and stated that, as to my acquirements, she had no doubt I should be able to give satisfaction; but in the engagement of governesses she considered those things as but subordinate points; as being situated in the neighbourhood of O , she could get masters to supply any deficiencies in that respect: but, in her opinion, next to unimpeachable morality, a mild and cheerful temper and obliging disposition were the most essential requisities.
Are there no other women who serve as governesses, and who are the equals of the persons whom they serve?
Lady Battledown makes all her governesses take the same name; she gives œ5 more a year for the purpose.
The storyteller was born on July 28, 1866 into a wealthy family and was educated at home in Kensington, London, by various governesses.
Austen does not condemn the profession of governesses per se, just the social and legal conditions that restrict a poor woman's choices to marriage, spinsterhood, the governess trade, or, in extremis, prostitution.
When Miss Emmie was in Russia; English governesses before, during and after the October Revolution.
Solodiankina, Inostrannye guvernantki v Rossii (vtoraia polovina XVIII-pervaia polovina XIX vekov) [Foreign Governesses in Russia (Second Half of the 18th and First Half of the 19th Centuries)].
In many cases governesses were deeply loved (one thinks of Churchill's nannv) but in others they were tolerated or snubbed.
No wonder governesses in 18th- and 19th-century novels were so often cast as frustrated, bitter women forced onto life's sidelines.
In a chapter on child raising, she disparages parents who employ governesses.