gracelessness


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grace·less

 (grās′lĭs)
adj.
1. Lacking grace; clumsy.
2. Having or exhibiting no sense of propriety or decency.
3. Inferior or clumsy in treatment or performance: a graceless production of the play.

grace′less·ly adv.
grace′less·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gracelessness - an unpleasant lack of grace in carriage or form or movement or expression
clumsiness, awkwardness - the carriage of someone whose movements and posture are ungainly or inelegant
2.gracelessness - the inelegance of someone stiff and unrelaxed (as by embarrassment)gracelessness - the inelegance of someone stiff and unrelaxed (as by embarrassment)
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
woodenness - the quality of being wooden and awkward; "he criticized the woodenness of the acting"; "there was a certain woodenness in his replies"
gaucherie, rusticity - the quality of being rustic or gauche
References in periodicals archive ?
tightrope Despite my gracelessness though, I feel calm and like I've had a good work out and the following day, my calves and core feel nicely stretched out.
Bolger tightrope Despite my gracelessness though, I feel calm and like I've had a good work out and the following day, my calves and core feel nicely stretched out.
Wenger's gracelessness is becoming almost as worrying to Arsenal fans as his trophylessness.
Or, and this was the real coup de gracelessness, head to Asda to pitch as a solution human breast milk ("lovingly made in Bristols") before trying to tempt people in the street to try it?
He had an oily dorsal fin of a nose and a gracelessness in his slightest actions.
In Republic 400d Socrates makes the same point even more strongly: 'But do gracefulness and gracelessness go with good and bad rhythm?
Scientists in Spain are trying to find a way to tackle gracelessness in robots.
It argues that, in addition to the gracelessness of the Squire's use of rhetorical figures like occupatio, which have been shown as successful failures by critics such as Shirley Sharon-Zisser, Chaucer also demonstrates a clumsiness in the Squire's use of numerous poetic devices, specifically rhyme, enjambment and caesura.
Luchini is especially adept at physical comedy, bringing an odd grace to utter gracelessness.
Such purposeful moments of gracelessness are read as "authentic," and thus closer to the speech of a rural working-class, one that sits opposed to a purely literary language.