grandeur


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Related to grandeur: delusions of grandeur

gran·deur

 (grăn′jər, -jo͝or′)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being grand; magnificence: "The world is charged with the grandeur of God" (Gerard Manley Hopkins).
2. Nobility or greatness of character.

[Middle English, from Old French, from grand, great, from Latin grandis.]

grandeur

(ˈɡrændʒə)
n
1. personal greatness, esp when based on dignity, character, or accomplishments
2. magnificence; splendour
3. pretentious or bombastic behaviour

gran•deur

(ˈgræn dʒər, -dʒʊər)

n.
1. the quality or state of being grand: the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains.
2. an instance of something that is grand.
[1490–1500; < French, Old French, =grand- grand + -eur -or1]

Grandeur

See also size.

1. Psychiatry. a form of mental illness marked by delusions of greatness, wealth, or power.
2. an obsession with doing extravagant or grand things. — megalomaniac, n. — megalomaniacal, adj.
Psychiatry. a slowly progressive personality disorder marked by delusions, especially of persecution and grandeur. — paranoid, paranoiac, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grandeur - the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grandgrandeur - the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand; "for magnificence and personal service there is the Queen's hotel"; "his `Hamlet' lacks the brilliance that one expects"; "it is the university that gives the scene its stately splendor"; "an imaginative mix of old-fashioned grandeur and colorful art"; "advertisers capitalize on the grandness and elegance it brings to their products"
elegance - a refined quality of gracefulness and good taste; "she conveys an aura of elegance and gentility"
eclat - brilliant or conspicuous success or effect; "the eclat of a great achievement"
2.grandeur - the quality of elevation of mind and exaltation of character or ideals or conductgrandeur - the quality of elevation of mind and exaltation of character or ideals or conduct
honorableness, honourableness - the quality of deserving honor or respect; characterized by honor
high-mindedness, noble-mindedness, idealism - elevated ideals or conduct; the quality of believing that ideals should be pursued
sublimity - nobility in thought or feeling or style

grandeur

noun
1. splendour, glory, majesty, nobility, pomp, state, magnificence, sumptuousness, sublimity, stateliness Only once inside do you appreciate the church's true grandeur.

grandeur

noun
Something meriting the highest praise or regard:
Translations
عَظَمَه، رَوْعَه
velkolepost
pragt
nagyszerűség
glæsileiki
didingumas
krāšņumslieliskums
azametihtişam

grandeur

[ˈgrændjəʳ] N [of occasion, scenery, house etc] → lo imponente; [of style] → lo elevado

grandeur

[ˈgrændʒər] n
[house, scenery] → magnificence f, splendeur f
[position] → éminence f

grandeur

nGröße f; (of scenery, music also)Erhabenheit f; (of manner also)Würde f, → Vornehmheit f

grandeur

[ˈgrændjəʳ] n (of occasion, scenery) → grandiosità, maestà; (of style, house) → splendore m

grandeur

(ˈgrӕndʒə) noun
great and impressive beauty. the grandeur of the Alps.
References in classic literature ?
For an instant, Cora and Alice had stood trembling and bewildered by this unexpected desertion; but before either had leisure for speech, or even thought, an officer of gigantic frame, whose locks were bleached with years and service, but whose air of military grandeur had been rather softened than destroyed by time, rushed out of the body of mist, and folded them to his bosom, while large scalding tears rolled down his pale and wrinkled cheeks, and he exclaimed, in the peculiar accent of Scotland:
On the other hand, I surveyed the famous river Ohio that rolled in silent dignity, marking the western boundary of Kentucke with inconceivable grandeur.
how could such a magnate be expected to contract his grandeur within the pitiful compass of seven shingled gables?
The figure of that first ancestor, invested by family tradition with a dim and dusky grandeur, was present to my boyish imagination as far back as I can remember.
I admired them, had fancies about them, for we could all profit in a degree, especially when they loomed through the dusk, by the grandeur of their actual battlements; yet it was not at such an elevation that the figure I had so often invoked seemed most in place.
Indeed, many are the Nantucket ships in which you will see the skipper parading his quarter-deck with an elated grandeur not surpassed in any military navy; nay, extorting almost as much outward homage as if he wore the imperial purple, and not the shabbiest of pilot-cloth.
Nor, in profile, does this wondrous brow diminish; though that way viewed, its grandeur does not domineer upon you so.
Huge pomegranate trees, with their glossy leaves and flame-colored flowers, dark-leaved Arabian jessamines, with their silvery stars, geraniums, luxuriant roses bending beneath their heavy abundance of flowers, golden jessamines, lemon-scented verbenum, all united their bloom and fragrance, while here and there a mystic old aloe, with its strange, massive leaves, sat looking like some old enchanter, sitting in weird grandeur among the more perishable bloom and fragrance around it.
I trust that we shall be more imaginative, that our thoughts will be clearer, fresher, and more ethereal, as our sky--our understanding more comprehensive and broader, like our plains--our intellect generally on a grander seale, like our thunder and lightning, our rivers and mountains and forests-and our hearts shall even correspond in breadth and depth and grandeur to our inland seas.
The inferior mountains on each side of the pass form a sort of frame for the picture of their dread lord, and close in the view so completely that no other prominent feature in the Oberland is visible from this BONG-A-BONG; nothing withdraws the attention from the solitary grandeur of the Finsteraarhorn and the dependent spurs which form the abutments of the central peak.
You shall, then, before you're three days older, Fallen Grandeur," says the duke.
True, the knife would not cut anything, but it was a "sure-enough" Barlow, and there was inconceivable grandeur in that -- though where the Western boys ever got the idea that such a weapon could possibly be counterfeited to its injury is an imposing mystery and will always remain so, perhaps.