grandiloquent

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gran·dil·o·quence

 (grăn-dĭl′ə-kwəns)
n.
Pompous or bombastic speech or expression.

[From grandiloquent, from Latin grandiloquus : grandis, great + loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]

gran·dil′o·quent adj.
gran·dil′o·quent·ly adv.

grandiloquent

(ɡrænˈdɪləkwənt)
adj
inflated, pompous, or bombastic in style or expression
[C16: from Latin grandiloquus, from grandis great + loquī to speak]
granˈdiloquence n
granˈdiloquently adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.grandiloquent - lofty in stylegrandiloquent - lofty in style; "he engages in so much tall talk, one never really realizes what he is saying"
rhetorical - given to rhetoric, emphasizing style at the expense of thought; "mere rhetorical frippery"
2.grandiloquent - puffed up with vanity; "a grandiloquent and boastful manner"; "overblown oratory"; "a pompous speech"; "pseudo-scientific gobbledygook and pontifical hooey"- Newsweek
pretentious - making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"

grandiloquent

adjective pompous, inflated, rhetorical, high-flown, pretentious, flowery, bombastic, high-sounding, fustian, orotund She attacked her colleagues for indulging in 'grandiloquent' language.

grandiloquent

adjective
Characterized by language that is elevated and sometimes pompous in style:
Translations
mahtipontinensuurieleinen
dagályosszónokias
górnolotnygrandilokwentny

grandiloquent

[grænˈdɪləkwənt] ADJaltisonante, grandilocuente

grandiloquent

[grænˈdɪləkwənt] adj [language] → grandiloquent(e)

grandiloquent

adj (form) language, style, speechhochtrabend; gestureübertrieben; descriptiongrandios
References in classic literature ?
Leonard Upjohn in his intricate style drew graceful little pictures of Cronshaw in the Latin Quarter, talking, writing poetry: Cronshaw became a picturesque figure, an English Verlaine; and Leonard Upjohn's coloured phrases took on a tremulous dignity, a more pathetic grandiloquence, as he described the sordid end, the shabby little room in Soho; and, with a reticence which was wholly charming and suggested a much greater generosity than modesty allowed him to state, the efforts he made to transport the Poet to some cottage embowered with honeysuckle amid a flowering orchard.
Seen from the front it appears to consist of a door and a window, though above them the trained eye may detect another window, the air-hole of some apartment which it would be just like Mary's grandiloquence to call her bedroom.
But your grandiloquence, and your conduct in swinging the beetle how excessively odd