grandiose


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gran·di·ose

 (grăn′dē-ōs′, grăn′dē-ōs′)
adj.
1. Characterized by greatness of scope or intent; grand: a grandiose plan to develop the city's waterfront.
2. Characterized by excessive self-importance or affected grandeur; pompous: "It's important ... for judges not to be rattled by political attacks into grandiose assertions of judicial supremacy" (Jeffrey Rosen).

[French, from Italian grandioso, from grande, great, from Latin grandis.]

gran′di·ose′ly adv.
gran′di·os′i·ty (-ŏs′ĭ-tē) n.

grandiose

(ˈɡrændɪˌəʊs)
adj
1. pretentiously grand or stately
2. imposing in conception or execution
[C19: from French, from Italian grandioso, from grande great; see grand]
ˈgrandiˌosely adv
grandiosity, ˌgrandiˈoseness n

gran•di•ose

(ˈgræn diˌoʊs)

adj.
1. affectedly grand; pompous: grandiose words.
2. more complicated than necessary: a grandiose scheme.
3. grand in an imposing way.
[1830–40; < French < Italian grandioso < Latin grandi(s) grand + -ōsus -ose1]
gran′di•ose`ly, adv.
gran′di•ose`ness, gran`di•os′i•ty (-ˈɒs ɪ ti) n.
syn: grandiose, ostentatious, pretentious, pompous refer to a conspicuous outward display designed to attract attention. grandiose may suggest impressiveness that is not objectionable; however, it most often implies exaggeration or affectation to the point of absurdity: the grandiose sweep of an arch; a grandiose idea to take a limousine to work. ostentatious has the negative connotation of trying to impress or outdo others: ostentatious furnishings. pretentious is always derogatory, suggesting falseness or exaggeration in claims made or implied: pretentious language that masked the absence of real content. pompous implies a display of exaggerated dignity or importance: a pompous bureaucrat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.grandiose - impressive because of unnecessary largeness or grandeur; used to show disapproval
impressive - making a strong or vivid impression; "an impressive ceremony"
2.grandiose - affectedly genteel
pretentious - making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"

grandiose

adjective
1. pretentious, ambitious, extravagant, flamboyant, high-flown, pompous, showy, ostentatious, bombastic Not one of his grandiose plans has ever come to anything.
pretentious down-to-earth, unpretentious
2. imposing, grand, impressive, magnificent, majestic, stately, monumental, lofty the grandiose building which housed the mayor's offices
imposing modest, humble, small-scale

grandiose

adjective
1. Large and impressive in size, scope, or extent:
2. Characterized by an exaggerated show of dignity or self-importance:
Informal: highfalutin.
Translations
فَخْم، عَظيم
grandiózní
grandiosstorladen
mikilfenglegur
grandiozinis
grandiozspārspīlēts
grandiózny
gösterişliheybetli

grandiose

[ˈgrændɪəʊz] ADJ
1. (= imposing) [style, building etc] → imponente, grandioso
2. (pej) [building etc] → ostentoso, hecho para impresionar; [scheme, plan] → vasto, ambicioso; [style] → exagerado, pomposo

grandiose

[ˈgrændiəʊs] adj
[plan, title] → grandiose
(pejorative) [claim] → pompeux/eusegrand jury n (US)jury m d'accusation (formé de 12 à 23 jurés)

grandiose

adj (= impressive) house, speech, ambitiongrandios (also pej), → großartig; (pej: = pompous) person, styleschwülstig, bombastisch (inf); idea, plangrandios, hochfliegend; claimgroßspurig

grandiose

[ˈgrændɪəʊz] adjgrandioso/a (pej) → pomposo/a

grandiose

(ˈgrӕndiəus) adjective
impressive to an excessive or foolish degree. He produced several grandiose schemes for a holiday resort but no resort was ever built.

grandiose

adj (psych) grandioso
References in classic literature ?
Such men will well understand the lancinating pains of the cancer which was now consuming Athanase; they have gone through those long and bitter deliberations made in presence of some grandiose purpose they had not the means to carry out; they have endured those secret miscarriages in which the fructifying seed of genius falls on arid soil.
From that, in answer to my questions, he came round to his grandiose plans again.
It was not a love of the grandiose or the prestige attached to the command of great tonnage, for he continued, with an air of disgust and contempt, "Why, you get flung out of your bunk as likely as not in any sort of heavy weather.
There were sheets on sheets of level, even brood-comb that had held in its time unnumbered thousands of unnamed workers; patches of obsolete drone-comb, broad and high-shouldered, showing to what marks the male grub was expected to grow; and two-inch deep honey-magazines, empty, but still magnificent, the whole gummed and glued into twisted scrap-work, awry on the wires; half-cells, beginnings abandoned, or grandiose, weak-walled, composite cells pieced out with rubbish and capped with dirt.
But his reputation had crossed the Atlantic before Maguire himself; the grandiose hotels had closed their doors to him; and he had already taken and sumptuously furnished the house in Half-moon Street which does not re-let to this day.
Let us add a quantity of fine, amusing, and varied streets, like the Rue de Rivoli, and I do not despair of Paris presenting to the eye, when viewed from a balloon, that richness of line, that opulence of detail, that diversity of aspect, that grandiose something in the simple, and unexpected in the beautiful, which characterizes a checker-board.
For his background he has chosen, has made his own and conveys very vividly to his readers, a district of France, gloomy, in spite of its almonds, its [123] oil and wine, but certainly grandiose.
It was in part a period of experimentation, when the proper material and limits of literary forms were being determined, oftentimes by means of false starts and grandiose failures.
A vaguely grandiose state of mental self-confidence is much too agreeable to be disturbed recklessly by such a delicate investigation.
Several of us, all more or less connected with the sea, were dining in a small river-hostelry not more than thirty miles from London, and less than twenty from that shallow and dangerous puddle to which our coasting men give the grandiose name of "German Ocean.
What is it that we call it in our grandiose speeches?
President Al-Sisi, it appeared, was more interested in practical steps than grandiose statements and also spoke about co-operation in tourism and maritime connections.