grandmother


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grand·moth·er

 (grănd′mŭth′ər, grăn′-)
n.
1. The mother of one's father or mother.
2. A female ancestor.

grandmother

(ˈɡrænˌmʌðə; ˈɡrænd-)
n
1. the mother of one's father or mother
2. (often plural) a female ancestor
3. (often capital) a familiar term of address for an old woman
4. teach one's grandmother to suck eggs See egg18

grand•moth•er

(ˈgrænˌmʌð ər, ˈgrænd-, ˈgræm-)

n.
1. the mother of one's father or mother.
2. a female ancestor.
[1375–1425]
grand′moth`er•ly, adj.
grand′moth`er•li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grandmother - the mother of your father or mothergrandmother - the mother of your father or mother
grandparent - a parent of your father or mother
nan - your grandmother

grandmother

noun gran, granny, grandma, nan My grandmothers are both widows.
Translations
баба
àvia
babička
bedstemor
avino
isoäiti
bababaka
nagyanyanagymama
amma
祖母お婆さん外祖母
할머니
avia
babababka
stara mama
babaбаба
farmormormor
ย่า ยาย
бабуся

grandmother

[ˈgrænˌmʌðəʳ] Nabuela f
stop trying to teach your grandmother to suck eggs (Brit) → ¿qué me vas a enseñar tú a mí?

grandmother

[ˈgrændmʌðər] ngrand-mère f
my grandmother → ma grand-mèreGrand Old Party n (US) the Grand Old Party → le parti républicain

grandmother

[ˈgrænˌmʌðəʳ] nnonna

grandfather

(ˈgrӕnfaːðə) grandmother (ˈgrӕnmaðə) , grandparent (ˈgrӕnpeərənt) noun
the father or mother of one's father or mother.
grandfather clock
a clock with a tall usually wooden case which stands on the floor.

grandmother

جَدَّة babička bedstemor Großmutter γιαγιά abuela isoäiti grand-mère baka nonna 祖母 할머니 grootmoeder bestemor babcia avó бабушка farmor ย่า ยาย büyükanne 祖母

grandmother

n abuela
References in classic literature ?
Once upon a time there was a dear little girl who was loved by everyone who looked at her, but most of all by her grandmother, and there was nothing that she would not have given to the child.
Set out before it gets hot, and when you are going, walk nicely and quietly and do not run off the path, or you may fall and break the bottle, and then your grandmother will get nothing; and when you go into her room, don't forget to say, "Good morning", and don't peep into every corner before you do it.
A tall woman, with wrinkled brown skin and black hair, stood looking down at me; I knew that she must be my grandmother.
The stove was very large, with bright nickel trimmings, and behind it there was a long wooden bench against the wall, and a tin washtub, into which grandmother poured hot and cold water.
This blow, so terrible to the grandmother and her dependent child, had occurred, too, most inopportunely, as to time.
Many of the menial offices, too, were to be performed by the wife of the porter, according to the bargain, leaving to poor Adrienne, however, all the care of her grandmother, whose room she seldom quitted, the duties of nurse and cook, and the still more important task of finding the means of subsistence.
Without knocking at the door, or in any way announcing our presence, I threw open the portals, and the Grandmother was borne through them in triumph.
But no sooner did the Grandmother appear than the General stopped dead in the middle of a word, and, with jaw dropping, stared hard at the old lady--his eyes almost starting out of his head, and his expression as spellbound as though he had just seen a basilisk.
His grandmother had been raised on a farm near the town and as a young girl had gone to school there when Winesburg was a village of twelve or fifteen houses clustered about a general store on the Trunion Pike.
said the little girl; for her old grandmother, the only person who had loved her, and who was now no more, had told her, that when a star falls, a soul ascends to God.
Valentine found her grandmother in bed; silent caresses, heartwrung sobs, broken sighs, burning tears, were all that passed in this sad interview, while Madame de Villefort, leaning on her husband's arm, maintained all outward forms of respect, at least towards the poor widow.
One evening they came over for a visit, and naturally the first subject upon which the conversation turned was the neighborhood and its history; and then Grandmother Majauszkiene, as the old lady was called, proceeded to recite to them a string of horrors that fairly froze their blood.