granny glasses

gran′ny glass`es


n.
(usu. with a pl. v.) eyeglasses with wirelike metal frames that sometimes sit below the bridge of the nose and often have oval lenses (often used with pair of).
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Gone are the silly forelock and the granny glasses, replaced by a tidier Wall Street coif and sober dark frames.
They start to ask, 'Why do I have to wear these granny glasses on the end of my nose?
Frizzy hair, granny glasses, not a bump on her, and as communicative as a cemetery statue.
Second place (17%) went to a portrait photograph of Lennon and the third most popular (12%) design showed the star standing in front of a microphone wearing a pair of his signature granny glasses.
Booth for four opposite, two gals in ankle-length patchwork skirts, two guys in long hair, bellbottoms, one with granny glasses and a fringed leather coat that cost as much as a good bicycle, probably.
9PM Johnny Depp peers through granny glasses as a rare-books expert hired to track down a tome.
While nostalgia is otherwise generally the order of the day here, it's not entirely filtered through rose-colored granny glasses, and the pic's colorful, almost-wastefully impressive cast limns a sociologically convincing rogue's gallery of reformed revolutionaries--some turned organic farmer, like the one played by Stephen Root (refreshingly cast against usual nerdy type); or university professor (Richard Jenkins), putting Franz Fanon on the reading list; or small businessman, like Nick Nolte's cleaned-up acid casualty.
Dressed on Thursday in a brown, quilted knee-length coat and simple gray pants, granny glasses perched smartly behind intelligent blue eyes, she hardly filled the "elitist hypocrite" moniker recently hurled her way by Scott's Brown campaign man.
Oliver Goldsmith secured his reputation most famously with his well-known granny glasses once worn by the late Beatle.
Owlishly attractive behind granny glasses and unflattering costumes (Vicki Sanchez knows her '80s), the actress sings beautifully and forces neither Celeste's kookiness nor the character's loneliness.
In their place are extra body padding, Granny glasses and hair scraped back from her forehead.
I imagine myself emceeing the Geezerstock Festival, standing on an outdoor stage, looking out at a vast audience of gray-haired hippies with paunches and granny glasses, as I speak in a slow, shaky voice.