granted


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grant

 (grănt)
tr.v. grant·ed, grant·ing, grants
1. To allow or consent to the fulfillment of (something requested): grant permission to speak frankly; grant a request.
2.
a. To give or confer officially or formally: grant voting rights to citizens; grant diplomatic immunity.
b. To transfer (property) by a deed.
3. To concede; acknowledge: I grant that your plan is ingenious, but you still will not find many backers.
n.
1. The act of granting.
2.
a. Something granted, especially a giving of funds for a specific purpose: federal grants for medical research.
b. The document or provision in a document by which a grant is made.
3. One of several tracts of land in New Hampshire, Maine, and Vermont originally granted to an individual or a group.

[Middle English granten, from Old French granter, variant of creanter, from Vulgar Latin *crēdentāre, to assure, from Latin crēdēns, crēdent-, present participle of crēdere, to believe; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

grant′a·ble adj.
grant′er n.

granted

(ˈɡrɑːntɪd; ˈɡræntɪd)
conj
even assuming that
adv
admittedly
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.granted - acknowledged as a supposition; "given the engine's condition, it is a wonder that it started"
acknowledged - recognized or made known or admitted; "the acknowledged leader of the community"; "a woman of acknowledged accomplishments"; "his acknowledged error"
Translations
připusťmeza předpokladu
hvis
taka e-î sem gefiî
za predpokladu
eğerfarzedelim ki

granted

[ˈgrɑːntɪd ˈgræntɪd]
conj (also granted that) → en admettant que
advadmettonsgrant-maintained school [ˈgræntmeɪnteɪndˈskuːl ˈgrɑːntmeɪnteɪndˈskuːl] n (British) établissement scolaire financé par l'État et non par une collectivité locale

grant

(graːnt) verb
1. to agree to, to give. Would you grant me one favour; He granted the man permission to leave.
2. to agree or admit. I grant (you) that it was a stupid thing to do.
noun
money given for a particular purpose. He was awarded a grant for studying abroad.
ˈgranted, ˈgranting
(even) if; assuming. Granted that you are right, we will have to move fast.
take for granted
1. to assume without checking. I took it for granted that you had heard the story.
2. to treat casually. People take electricity for granted until their supply is cut off.
References in classic literature ?
So she enjoyed herself heartily, and found, what isn't always the case, that her granted wish was all she had hoped.
I became somewhat embarrassed, for I was used to being taken for granted by my elders.
Duquesne, eleven other Frenchmen, and some of their own chiefs, and marched up within view of our fort, with British and French colours flying; and having sent a summons to me, in his Britannick Majesty's name, to surrender the fort, I requested two days consideration, which was granted.
Saddest of all, moreover, the lover was none the happier for the maiden's granted kiss
Heaven hath granted thee an open ignominy, that thereby thou mayest work out an open triumph over the evil within thee and the sorrow without.
And, indeed, the shock was so sudden and violent, that we took it for granted the ship had struck against a rock; but when the amazement was a little over, we cast the lead, and sounded, but found no ground.
Things that were quite unspeakable went on there in the packing houses all the time, and were taken for granted by everybody; only they did not show, as in the old slavery times, because there was no difference in color between master and slave.
You may be all right, of course, and we'll hope that you are; but to take it for granted isn't business.
It was granted that this was plenty good enough circumstantial evidence.
Then conscience granted a truce, and these curiously inconsistent pirates fell peacefully to sleep.
Then I see it all, and how we had took too much for granted.
All this was taken very much for granted, as a rule, but now and then some supersensitive person made violent objections to it, as a theory of life.