graphite


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graph·ite

 (grăf′īt′)
n.
A soft crystalline allotrope of carbon, composed of graphene layers, having a steel-gray to black metallic luster and a greasy feel, used in lead pencils, lubricants, paints and coatings, and fabricated into a variety of forms such as molds, bricks, electrodes, crucibles, and rocket nozzles. Also called black lead, plumbago.

[Greek graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots + -ite.]

gra·phit′ic (gră-fĭt′ĭk) adj.

graphite

(ˈɡræfaɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a blackish soft allotropic form of carbon in hexagonal crystalline form: used in pencils, crucibles, and electrodes, as a lubricant, as a moderator in nuclear reactors, and, in a carbon fibre form, as a tough lightweight material for sporting equipment. Also called: plumbago
[C18: from German Graphit; from Greek graphein to write + -ite1]
graphitic adj

graph•ite

(ˈgræf aɪt)

n.
a soft native carbon occurring in black to dark gray foliated masses: used for pencil leads, as a lubricant, as a moderator in nuclear reactors, and for making crucibles and other refractories; plumbago.
[1790–1800; < German Graphit < Greek gráph(ein) to write, draw + German -it -ite1]
gra•phit•ic (grəˈfɪt ɪk) adj.

graph·ite

(grăf′īt′)
A naturally occurring, steel-gray to black, crystalline form of carbon. The carbon atoms in graphite are strongly bonded together in sheets. Because the bonds between the sheets are weak, other atoms can easily fit between them, causing the graphite to be soft and slippery to the touch. Graphite is used in pencils and paints and as a lubricant and electrode. It is also used to control chain reactions in nuclear reactors because of its ability to absorb neutrons. See Note at carbon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.graphite - used as a lubricant and as a moderator in nuclear reactorsgraphite - used as a lubricant and as a moderator in nuclear reactors
pencil lead, lead - mixture of graphite with clay in different degrees of hardness; the marking substance in a pencil
atomic number 6, carbon, C - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
pencil - graphite (or a similar substance) used in such a way as to be a medium of communication; "the words were scribbled in pencil"; "this artist's favorite medium is pencil"
Translations
رصاص أقلام، غرافيت
tuha
grafit
grafít
grafitas
grafīts

graphite

[ˈgræfaɪt] Ngrafito m

graphite

[ˈgræfaɪt] ngraphite m

graphite

nGrafit m, → Graphit m

graphite

[ˈgræfaɪt] ngrafite f

graphite

(ˈgrӕfait) noun
a form of carbon used in the leads of pencils.
References in classic literature ?
This vacuum economised the graphite points between which the luminous arc was developed--an important point of economy for Captain Nemo, who could not easily have replaced them; and under these conditions their waste was imperceptible.
He opened the kit bag and oiled his wheel, putting graphite on the chain and adjusting the bearings.
Graphite use is also expected to rise sharply due to its growing use in Pebble Bed Nuclear Reactors ("PBNR").
However, the addition of materials, such as graphite, cellulose and western bentonite do not generate sufficient reducing atmospheres to replace seacoal.
Chapter Six Graphite Heat Exchanger Production Supply Sales Consumption Market Status and Forecast 2010-2015
A graphite club, depending on the grade of the graphite, weighs anywhere from 60 to 105 grams.
The seventh, final Section of the report is devoted to forecast of natural graphite production in CIS up to 2015.
Scientists have long known that the graphite used to slow down neutrons shooting from the fuel in old-style nuclear reactors accumulates crystal defects that store energy.
As Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Michael will have overall responsibility for the contracting and distribution of natural flake graphite from Ontario Graphite's Kearney graphite mine.
In July 2011 Archer reported the results of detailed petrological work that identified highly prized large flake graphite at each of the first three graphite occurrences tested on Wildhorse Plain.
The critical role of S as a graphite flake nucleating and growth player was well-established and documented through work by Alfred Boyles.
Last August, several speakers at an STM conference in Baltimore remarked that features of a substrate called highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) can muddle interpretations of biomolecular studies.