grapholect

grapholect

(ˈɡræfəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics an established and standardized written language
References in periodicals archive ?
A grapholect is a transdialectal language formed by deep commitment to writing.
Dialect, Grapholect, and Story: Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker as Science Fiction.
A grapholect emerges when one version of a particular language among many becomes selected for elaboration as the 'correct' version of that language in writing.
Historically, however, the humanistic study of language in undergraduate college courses has focused on acquiring a detailed knowledge of a grapholect, combining reading and writing, listening and speaking, in varying degrees.
This phenomenon, called diglossia, is found everywhere that a grapholect has been elaborated, but Arabic is somewhat more complicated since two distinct varieties of the same language are used side by side in the same speech community, each having a set of specialized functions.
The grapholect presumes that only reason, untouched by emotions, can produce knowledge.
The grapholect further excludes participants and other audiences by installing the researcher--and colleagues who evaluate the work--as "experts" possessing superior knowledge necessary to understand the jargon and ideas of the research.
Not surprisingly, feminist researchers often found it useful to employ the metadiscourse techniques of the masculine grapholect.
It is unfair to suggest, however, that some feminist researchers prefer traditional social science methods or the masculine grapholect purely as a matter of political pragmatism.
What we described as feminine style appears to Bizzell (1999) as a specialized example of a "new hybrid discourse" that challenges the grapholect.
Family, marital, and other relational and communicative issues also may be studied experimentally and in laboratories with no apparent feminist concerns, and expressed using the masculine grapholect, resulting in a category with few exemplars: traditional research/ feminine style.
As Rabkin explains: The fantastic takes words and reconfigures their semantic ranges, puts them in new contexts, creates new grapholects for them, and in so doing it liberates us" (26).