gratingly


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Adv.1.gratingly - in a harsh and grating manner; "her voice fell gratingly on our ears"
References in classic literature ?
I heard him clear gratingly his parched throat, and became all attention.
His face remains wooden as he rattles off statistics about his own success rate, but the same couldn't be said about Fadnis, who's gratingly screechy and hysterical in most scenes.
Only in the Western European languages of English and French do we find the strange phenomenon in which spelling and pronunciation clash heavily and gratingly.
Jose Mari Chan's ubiquitous crooning about sparkling lights and stardust and the love we have for Jesus sounds gratingly insipid amid the wailing of widows and orphans and the rumble of a collapsing democracy.
Then again, some may feel that Brad (Will Ferrell), Dusty's "co-dad", has an even worse dad, gratingly gushy Don (John Lithgow) who tends to over-share and cry at the drop of a hat.
He appreciated that Jay was forthcoming even as he envied the ability to be so open, gratingly honest.
One signatory, Di Young, commented: "It's just gratingly awful".
Blowing away traditional storytelling conventions with the same withering contempt that seems to motivate its characters' every interaction, "Steve Jobs" is a bravura backstage farce, a wildly creative fantasia in three acts in which every scene plays out as a real-time volley of insults and ideas--insisting, with sometimes gratingly repetitive sound and fury, that Jobs' gift for innovation was perhaps inextricable from his capacity for cruelty.
At the same time, it is to some degree also biographic--at times somewhat gratingly, as for instance when Pappe reproduces a verbatim praise of his statements and intellectual approach by Edward Said and Perry Anderson (pp.
And our poshest and most gratingly English politicians (all the ones in power, basically) had wisely opted to keep their heads down.
And those 18th-century conventions of speech and etiquette are often gratingly stilted in "Belle,'' stifling the film of any naturalism.