gravamen

(redirected from gravamina)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

gra·va·men

 (grə-vā′mən)
n. pl. gra·va·mens or gra·vam·i·na (-văm′ə-nə) Law
The main claim or most important aspect of a complaint against a defendant.

[Medieval Latin gravāmen, injury, accusation, from Late Latin, encumbrance, obligation, from Latin gravāre, to burden, from gravis, heavy; see grave2.]

gravamen

(ɡrəˈveɪmɛn)
n, pl -vamina (-ˈvæmɪnə)
1. (Law) law that part of an accusation weighing most heavily against an accused
2. (Law) law the substance or material grounds of a complaint
3. a rare word for grievance
[C17: from Late Latin: trouble, from Latin gravāre to load, from gravis heavy; see grave2]

gra•va•men

(grəˈveɪ mən)

n., pl. -vam•i•na (-ˈvæm ə nə)
the part of an accusation weighing most heavily against the accused.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin: trouble, physical inconvenience = Latin gravā(re) to load, weigh down (derivative of gravis heavy, burdened) + -men n. suffix]

gravamen

a grievance, especially one that is the cause of a legal action.
See also: Discontent
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

gravamen

noun
Law. The most central and material part:
Translations

gravamen

n. agravio, motivo de queja.
References in periodicals archive ?
The claim to have ordinary faculties to dispense from marital impediments was only one of many set forth in the so-called Gravamina that the German metropolites issued in 1769 and turned into a political program at Ems in 1786.
These councils contributed to the growing gravamina directed against the papal curia, which subsequently developed into a more general criticism of Rome in the German lands, a criticism fed by Habsburg propaganda in the reigns of Frederick III and Maximilian I.