grave goods


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grave goods

Tools, weapons, clothing, or other objects found in ancient tombs, presumably placed there for the deceased to use in the afterlife.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bronze Age communities have left us with not only their stone monuments but fascinating hordes of weapons, grave goods and tools.
The rich material of grave goods should rather be seen as tangible expressions of underlying values.
However, the distribution of the grave goods within the grave, their spatial relation to the female individual and the total lack of any typically female-attributed grave artifacts disputes this possibility," the study found.
It means that in the afterlife you are missing an arm or leg, but you are missing all the grave goods you need as well.
No longer rigidly tied to status representation, so Lai argues, the purpose of the two new categories of grave goods was to negotiate prestige through public display during the funerary rituals; they also were thought to clearly demarcate the line between the living and the dead.
Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits is essentially an absorbing inside account of struggles to reclaim human remains, grave goods and other heritage artefacts.
to co-create a plan to identify and return ancestral remains and belongings of cultural significance, including grave goods, ceremonial regalia and shamanic material.
Walking into this recent show of Joachim Bandau's work, one could not help but recall how Adorno's thinking, and that of some of his Frankfurt School colleagues, was characterized by axioms of exuberant pessimism: Humanity is deformed by a military-industrial cage; sexuality has been harnessed by the culture industries; our senses have been dulled by the media machine; our consumer society is nothing other than a cultural mausoleum, richly decked out with grave goods.
The Owl Inini's incomplete remains were discovered in 1987 from an eroding bank along with grave goods and camp debris.
Main features: the market for the provision and installation of grave goods in the cemetery of aubergenville
The boat grave dates to the 10th century in the Viking Age, and grave goods placed in the boat include an iron axe, a cowhide in which the body was wrapped, and pillow remains consisting of feather stuffing and a wool textile cover.