gravitational constant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

gravitational constant

n. Abbr. G
The constant relating the force of gravitational attraction between two bodies to the product of their masses and the inverse square of the distance between them in Newton's law of gravitation. It equals 6.67 × 10-11 m3kg-1s-2.

gravitational constant

n
(General Physics) the factor relating force to mass and distance in Newton's law of gravitation. It is a universal constant with the value 6.673 × 10–11 N m2 kg–2. Symbol: G

grav·i·ta·tion·al constant

(grăv′ĭ-tā′shə-nəl)
A number used to calculate the force of the gravitational attraction between two bodies in Newton's law of gravitation. The gravitational constant equals 6.67 × 10-11 cubic meters per kilogram per second squared. See more at Newton's law of gravitation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravitational constant - (physics) the universal constant relating force to mass and distance in Newton's law of gravitationgravitational constant - (physics) the universal constant relating force to mass and distance in Newton's law of gravitation
law of gravitation, Newton's law of gravitation - (physics) the law that states any two bodies attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
constant - a number representing a quantity assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context; "the velocity of light is a constant"
Translations
Gravitationskonstante
References in periodicals archive ?
2]/2[pi]c) is the reduced sub-Planckian "action" constant, G is the Newtonian gravitational constant, and c is the velocity of light.
j] is a random number in the interval [0, 1], G(t) is the gravitational constant at time t, [M.
81 (m/(s^2)) Gravitational constant -32 (ft/(s^2)) Gravitational constant [PI]/(dh)=(MRT)/(dh) Gravitational constant [j=osmotic pressure; d=density; h=height; M=concentration (molarity) of solution; R=ideal gas constant; T=temperature in Kelvins] w/m Gravitational constant [w=weight; m=mass] H E+PV Enthalpy [E=energy; P=pressure; V=volume] E/v Planck's constant [E=energy; v=frequency] E/f Planck's constant [E=energy; f=frequency] (E[lambda])/c Planck's constant [E=energy; [lambda]=wavelength; c=speed of light] mv[lambda] Planck's constant [m=mass; v=velocity; [lambda]=wavelength] [lambda][rho] Planck's constant [[lambda]=wavelength; [rho]=momentum] 6.
b] is the bulk density of the powder, and g is equal to the gravitational constant.
The underlying measurements for the mass and density of the planets are based on a single assumption that the equation for gravity is correct and the gravitational constant is universal.
The point at which a stellar object can no longer escape being swallowed by a black hole is known as the Schwarzschild radius, a quantity whose value depends on the black hole's mass, the speed of light and the gravitational constant.
c], [gamma], T, and p denote the gravitational potential, gravitational constant, thermal conductivity, gas constant, velocity of light, density of ionized component, density of neutral components ([rho] >> [[rho].
The Planck length is derived from Newton's gravitational constant, the speed of light and Planck's own constant from quantum theory.
where v is the angular speed of a test particle about a body of mass M, G is the gravitational constant and r is the distance between the test particle and the massive body, a is a coefficient of the order of unity that depends on the exact definitions of v and r, as well as the geometry of the system.
where r is the scalar curvature at any point of the space time and K is the gravitational constant [6].
In the Einstein's field equations the Gravitational constant G has been introduced via the Newtonian approximation of the Einstein field equation.