gravity

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grav·i·ty

 (grăv′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. Physics
a. The natural attraction between physical bodies, especially when one of the bodies is a celestial body, such as the earth.
2. Grave consequence; seriousness or importance: They are still quite unaware of the gravity of their problems.
3. Solemnity or dignity of manner.

[French gravité, heaviness, from Old French, from Latin gravitās, from gravis, heavy; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots.]

gravity

(ˈɡrævɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (General Physics) the force of attraction that moves or tends to move bodies towards the centre of a celestial body, such as the earth or moon
2. (General Physics) the property of being heavy or having weight. See also specific gravity, centre of gravity
3. (General Physics) another name for gravitation
4. seriousness or importance, esp as a consequence of an action or opinion
5. manner or conduct that is solemn or dignified
6. (Classical Music) lowness in pitch
7. (General Physics) (modifier) of or relating to gravity or gravitation or their effects: gravity wave; gravity feed.
[C16: from Latin gravitās weight, from gravis heavy]

grav•i•ty

(ˈgræv ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the force of attraction by which terrestrial bodies tend to fall toward the center of the earth.
2. heaviness or weight.
3. gravitation in general.
5. serious or critical nature: to ignore the gravity of one's illness.
6. serious or dignified behavior.
7. lowness in pitch, as of sounds.
[1500–10; < Latin gravitās heaviness =grav(is) heavy, grave2 + -itās -ity]

grav·i·ty

(grăv′ĭ-tē)
1. The attraction that objects have for each other merely because they have mass and occupy space. Gravity is the weakest of the four basic forces in nature, being weaker than the strong nuclear force, the electromagnetic force, and the weak nuclear force. See more at acceleration, relativity.
2. This force as it operates in and around the Earth and other massive objects (such as the planets).
Did You Know? Isaac Newton discovered gravity, which he saw as the mutual attraction that two masses have for each other. Newton developed an equation that showed that any two objects in the universe, no matter how far apart or how small, exert an instantaneous gravitational effect on each other. These effects diminish, however, as the distance between the objects gets larger and as the masses of the objects get smaller, so that for many distant objects or objects with barely any mass, the effects of gravity are very small. Newton seemed to have the last word on gravity, until Albert Einstein came along. He noted that gravity's effects could not be instantaneous, since they would have to travel at infinite velocities, violating his theory of relativity, which states that nothing can travel faster than light. He also showed that gravity and acceleration are related. Imagine, he said, that you are an astronaut standing in a stationary rocket on Earth: because of Earth's gravity your feet are pressed against the rocket's floor with a force equal to your weight. Now imagine that you are in the same rocket, in outer space, in an area that has no gravitational pull. Even though you are weightless, if the rocket is accelerating and its floor is pushing against your feet, you feel as if you are being acted upon by a gravitational field. Unless you look out the window you have no idea whether the rocket is at rest on Earth or accelerating through space.

gravity

- Comes from Latin gravitas, from gravis, "heavy, important"—and it can apply to situations and problems as well as to people.
See also related terms for problems.

Gravity

See also physics.

Medicine. the absence of the power to recognize weight through the senses; the absence of barognosis.
Medicine. the conscious perception of weight, especially through cutaneous and muscular nerves.
Archaic. a branch of physics that studied weight and its relationship to gravity.
an abnormal fear of gravity.
the movement of an organism in response to the force of gravity.
Botany. the response of a plant to the force of gravity. — geotropic, adj.
the theories of the 18th-century Yorkshireman John Hutchinson, which included a rejection of Newton’s theory of gravitation. See also bible; theology. — Hutchinsonian, adj.
a hypothetical force, opposed to gravity, once believed to be a property inherent in certain bodies or materials.
the production of motion in a body, apparently without the use of material force, a power long claimed by mediums and magicians. Also called teleportation.telekinetic, adj.
the science or theory of tides.

gravity


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Intensity of gravitation measured at the surface of a star, planet or other heavenly body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravity - (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universegravity - (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "the more remote the body the less the gravity"; "the gravitation between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them"; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--Albert Einstein
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
solar gravity - the gravity of the sun; "solar gravity creates extreme pressures and temperatures"
2.gravity - a manner that is serious and solemn
serious-mindedness, earnestness, seriousness, sincerity - the trait of being serious; "a lack of solemnity is not necessarily a lack of seriousness"- Robert Rice
stodginess, stuffiness - dull and pompous gravity
3.gravity - a solemn and dignified feeling
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
earnestness, seriousness, sincerity - an earnest and sincere feeling
levity - feeling an inappropriate lack of seriousness

gravity

noun
2. solemnity, gloom, seriousness, gravitas, thoughtfulness, grimness There was an appealing gravity to everything she said.
solemnity joy, happiness, gaiety, frivolity, merriment, levity, flippancy, thoughtlessness
Related words
fear barophobia

gravity

noun
1. The condition of being grave and of involving serious consequences:
2. High seriousness of manner or bearing:
Translations
جاذِبِيَّهقُوة الجاذبيَّه
gravitacepřitažlivostvážnostzávažnost
alvortyngdetyngdekraft
gravitaatiopainovoima
gravitáció
gravitategravitation
gaya tarik bumigravitasi
òyngdarafl
引力重力
pievilkšanas spēks
tiaž
težnost

gravity

[ˈgrævɪtɪ]
A. N
1. (Phys) → gravedad f
the law of gravityla ley de la gravedad
2. (= seriousness) [of situation, event] → gravedad f
this is a situation of the utmost gravityésta es una situación de la mayor gravedad
3. (= solemnity) [of tone, manner] → gravedad f
B. CPD gravity feed Nalimentación f por gravedad

gravity

[ˈgrævɪti] n
(PHYSICS)gravité f, pesanteur f
(= seriousness) [situation] → gravité f; [crime] → gravité f

gravity

n
(Phys) → Schwere f, → Schwerkraft f; the law(s) of gravitydas Gravitationsgesetz; centre (Brit) or center (US) of gravitySchwerpunkt m; force of gravitySchwerkraft f; gravity feedFall- or Schwerkraftspeisung f
(= seriousness, of person, expression, situation, matter, threat) → Ernst m; (of mistake, illness, crime)Schwere f; (of danger, problem, difficulty)Größe f; (of consequences)schwerwiegende Art; the gravity of the newsdie schlimmen Nachrichten

gravity

[ˈgrævɪtɪ] n (all senses) → gravità
the law of gravity → la legge di gravità

gravity2

(ˈgrӕvəti) noun
the force which attracts things towards the Earth and causes them to fall to the ground.

grav·i·ty

n. fuerza de gravedad;
specific ______ específica.