gravity wave


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gravity wave

n.
1. A wave induced in a fluid, especially the ocean or atmosphere, by the interaction of gravity with other forces on the motion of the fluid.
2. A gravitational wave. Not in technical use.

gravity wave

n
1. (General Physics) a wave propagated in a gravitational field, predicted to occur as a result of an accelerating mass
2. (General Physics) a surface wave on water or other liquid propagated because of the weight of liquid in the crests
Also called: gravitational wave
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravity wave - (physics) a wave that is hypothesized to propagate gravity and to travel at the speed of light
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
References in periodicals archive ?
They were being excited by some external signal, but the actual response I was seeing was not a gravity wave, but simply the transient response of each of these circuits as they resonated at their not-quite-equal natural frequencies.
That is the reason why theapproximate asymptotical methods are systematically used for the investigation of the internal gravity wave fields in stratified ocean.
Numerical experiments on internal gravity waves in an accelerating shear flow.
Even weak gravity waves may innate turbulence," explains coauthor John Knox, a specialist in atmospheric science.
The gravity wave speed stability restriction on the baroclinic part is removed and the 3D baroclinic equations can be integrated explicitly using a large time step.
From this one can hypothesize that ordinary gravity waves (the waves that compose the standing wave) move at near infinite velocities since its frequencies would be so high coming from an infinitesimally small portion of matter.
We see similar gravity-wave phenomena here on Earth, and NASA's New Horizons spacecraft chronicled evidence for gravity waves in the atmosphere of Pluto during its historic 2015 flyby.
LIGO has agreements with telescopes around the world (and in space) to keep an eye out for any flashes of light that occur at the same time as a gravity wave detection.
The topics include solar cycle changes in the photochemistry of the ionosphere and thermosphere, traveling atmospheric disturbance and gravity wave coupling in the thermosphere, comparative studies of theoretical models in the equatorial ionosphere, inductive-dynamic coupling of the ionosphere with the thermosphere and the magnetosphere, and the model-based inversion of the auroral process.
GPS RO has provided a unique opportunity for us to understand the global distribution of atmospheric gravity wave activity.
The gravity wave ripples are much, much smaller--on the order of a billionth of a nanometer over a two mile span and--are actually expansions and contractions in space and time.