greatness


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great

 (grāt)
adj. great·er, great·est
1.
a. Very large in size, extent, or intensity: a great pile of rubble; a great storm.
b. Of a larger size than other, similar forms: the great anteater.
c. Large in quantity or number: A great throng awaited us. See Synonyms at large.
d. Extensive in time or distance: a great delay; a great way off.
2.
a. Remarkable or outstanding in magnitude, degree, or extent: a great crisis; great anticipation.
b. Of outstanding significance or importance: a great work of art.
c. Chief or principal: the great house on the estate.
d. Superior in quality or character; noble: a great man who dedicated himself to helping others.
e. Powerful; influential: one of the great nations of the West.
f. Eminent; distinguished: a great leader.
3. Informal
a. Very good; first-rate: We had a great time at the dance.
b. Very skillful: She is great at algebra.
c. Enthusiastic: a great lover of music.
4. Being one generation removed from the relative specified. Often used in combination: a great-granddaughter.
5. Archaic Pregnant.
n.
1. pl. greats or great One that is great: a composer considered among the greats.
2. Music
a. A division of most pipe organs, usually containing the most powerful ranks of pipes.
b. A similar division of other organs.
adv. Informal
1. Very well: got along great with the teacher.
2. Used as an intensive with certain adjectives: a great big kiss.

[Middle English grete, from Old English grēat, thick, coarse.]

great′ly adv.
great′ness n.

Greatness

 

See Also: FAME, INTELLIGENCE, MIND

  1. Early genius is like a cabbage: it doesn’t head well —Bartlett’s Dictionary of Americanisms
  2. A fine genius, in his own country, is like gold in the mine —Ben Franklin
  3. Genius, in one respect, is like gold —numbers of persons are constantly writing about both who have neither —Charles Caleb Colton
  4. Genius is like a flint of many edges, but it is the edges that give the sparkle —Moritz Gottlieb Saphir
  5. Genius, like humanity, rusts for want of use —William Hazlitt
  6. Genius, like water, will find its level —Proverb
  7. Genius must have talent as its complement and implement, just as, in like manner, imagination must have fancy —Samuel Taylor Coleridge Coleridge built on this simile as follows: “In short, the higher intellectual powers can only act through a corresponding energy of the lower.”
  8. Genius without education is like silver in the mine —Benjamin Franklin
  9. A genius without vices is like a race horse without a good jockey —Benjamin De Casseres
  10. Great men are like mountains; we do not appreciate their magnitude while we are still close to them —Joseph Chamberlain
  11. Great men are like meteors; they litter and are consumed to enlighten the world —Napoleon Bonaparte
  12. Great men, like great epochs, are explosive material in whom tremendous energy has been accumulated —Friedrich Nietzsche The simile is sometimes quoted with the word ‘ages’ substituted for ‘epochs.’
  13. Great men stand like solitary towers in the city of God —William Wadsworth Longfellow
  14. Great minds are like eagles, and build their nest in some lofty solitude —Arthur Schopenhauer
  15. It is with rivers as it is with people: the greatest are not always the most agreeable nor the best to live with —Henry Van Dyke
  16. Men of genius are like eagles, that live on what they kill, while men of talents are like crows, that live on what has been killed for them —Josh Billings In Billings’ special phonetic dialect this reads: “Men ov genius … tha live on what tha … while men ov … tha live on what haz bin killed for them.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.greatness - the property possessed by something or someone of outstanding importance or eminence
importance - the quality of being important and worthy of note; "the importance of a well-balanced diet"
2.greatness - unusual largeness in size or extent or number
bigness, largeness - the property of having a relatively great size
enormity - vastness of size or extent; "in careful usage the noun enormity is not used to express the idea of great size"; "universities recognized the enormity of their task"

greatness

noun
1. grandeur, glory, majesty, splendour, power, pomp, magnificence the greatness of ancient Rome
2. fame, glory, celebrity, distinction, eminence, note, lustre, renown, illustriousness Abraham Lincoln achieved greatness.
Quotations
"No really great man ever thought himself so" [William Hazlitt Whether Genius is Conscious of Its Powers?]
"He is greatest who is most often in men's good thoughts" [Samuel Butler Note-Books]
"There would be no great ones if there were no little ones" [George Herbert Outlandish Proverbs]
"The greatest spirits are capable of the greatest vices as well as of the greatest virtues" [René Descartes Discourse on Method]
"It is the privilege of greatness to confer intense happiness with insignificant gifts" [Friedrich Nietzsche Human, All Too Human]
"Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em" [William Shakespeare Twelfth Night]
"Few great men could pass Personnel" [Paul Goodman Growing Up Absurd]

greatness

noun
1. The quality or state of being large in amount, extent, or importance:
2. Something meriting the highest praise or regard:
Translations
عَظَمَه
velikost
storhed
mikilleiki; mikilvægi
veličina

greatness

[ˈgreɪtnɪs] Ngrandeza f
he was destined for greatnesssu destino era grande

greatness

[ˈgreɪtnɪs] n [person] → grandeur fGreat Plains npl
the Great Plains → les Grandes Plaines fplgreat-uncle [ˌgreɪtˈʌŋkəl] ngrand-oncle mGreat Wall of China n
the Great Wall of China → la Grande Muraille de Chine

greatness

nGröße f; (of size, height, degree etc also)Ausmaß nt; (= importance also)Bedeutung f; greatness of heartHochherzigkeit f, → Großmut f; greatness of mindGeistesgröße f

greatness

[ˈgreɪtnɪs] ngrandezza

great

(greit) adjective
1. of a better quality than average; important. a great writer; Churchill was a great man.
2. very large, larger etc than average. a great crowd of people at the football match.
3. of a high degree. Take great care of that book.
4. very pleasant. We had a great time at the party.
5. clever and expert. John's great at football.
ˈgreatly adverb
I was greatly impressed by her singing.
ˈgreatness noun
her greatness as an athlete.
References in classic literature ?
She began to see that character is a better possession than money, rank, intellect, or beauty, and to feel that if greatness is what a wise man has defined it to be, `truth, reverence, and good will', then her friend friedrich Bhaer was not only good, but great.
It was the Lenni Lenape," returned Magua, affecting to bend his head in reverence to their former greatness.
The scene had a greatness that made it a different affair from my own scant home, and there immediately appeared at the door, with a little girl in her hand, a civil person who dropped me as decent a curtsy as if I had been the mistress or a distinguished visitor.
Be sure of this, O young ambition, all mortal greatness is but disease.
Oh, now I feel my topmost greatness lies in my topmost grief.
A most noble benignity and purity reposed in the counte- nance of him they called Sir Galahad, and likewise in the king's also; and there was majesty and greatness in the giant frame and high bearing of Sir Launcelot of the Lake.
Tom was introduced to the Judge; but his tongue was tied, his breath would hardly come, his heart quaked -- partly because of the awful greatness of the man, but mainly because he was her parent.
They had music; Emma was obliged to play; and the thanks and praise which necessarily followed appeared to her an affectation of candour, an air of greatness, meaning only to shew off in higher style her own very superior performance.
You, Miss Dashwood, would give a general commission for every new print of merit to be sent you--and as for Marianne, I know her greatness of soul, there would not be music enough in London to content her.
He felt the greatness and goodness of his purpose so sincerely: others who heard him plead for it, could not but feel it too.
The greatness of England, ma'am -- the true greatness of England.
See, the haft is split because of the greatness of my stroke