greediness


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greed·y

 (grē′dē)
adj. greed·i·er, greed·i·est
1. Having or showing a strong or excessive desire to acquire money or possess things, especially wishing to possess more than what one needs or deserves.
2. Having or showing a desire to eat or drink in large or excessive amounts.
3. Extremely eager or desirous for an activity or pursuit: greedy for the opportunity to prove their ability.

[Middle English gredi, from Old English grǣdig; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]

greed′i·ly adv.
greed′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.greediness - an excessive desire for food
gluttony - habitual eating to excess
2.greediness - an excessive desire for wealth (usually in large amounts); "the greediness of lawyers"
selfishness - stinginess resulting from a concern for your own welfare and a disregard of others
Translations
جَشَع، شَرَه
chamtivostnenasytnost
grådighedgriskhed
græîgi
açgözlülük

greediness

nGierigkeit f; (= gluttony)Gefräßigkeit f

greed

(griːd) noun
a (too) great desire for food, money etc. Eating five cakes is just sheer greed.
ˈgreedy adjective
ˈgreedily adverb
ˈgreediness noun
References in classic literature ?
He would have heard of channels and sandbanks, of natural features of the land useful for sea-marks, of villages and tribes and modes of barter and precautions to take: with the instructive tales about native chiefs dyed more or less blue, whose character for greediness, ferocity, or amiability must have been expounded to him with that capacity for vivid language which seems joined naturally to the shadiness of moral character and recklessness of disposition.
Now this king was very fond of money; and when he heard the miller's boast his greediness was raised, and he sent for the girl to be brought before him.
said Fagin, cursing his dear young friend's greediness from the very bottom of his heart.
I did indeed observe that the YAHOOS were the only animals in this country subject to any diseases; which, however, were much fewer than horses have among us, and contracted, not by any ill-treatment they meet with, but by the nastiness and greediness of that sordid brute.
He frowned, trying to appear as if he did not want any of that wine, but was mortified because no one would understand that it was not to quench his thirst or from greediness that he wanted it, but simply from a conscientious desire for knowledge.
It might have pleased him, too, in some degree, to have seen how dull and dissatisfied she was throughout that week (the greater part of it, at least), for lack of her usual source of excitement; and how often she regretted having 'used him up so soon,' like a child that, having devoured its plumcake too hastily, sits sucking its fingers, and vainly lamenting its greediness.
They were more ready to order than the landlady was to provide; however, after being pretty well satisfied by them of the real truth of the case, and that Mr Fitzpatrick was no thief, she was at length prevailed on to set some cold meat before them, which they were devouring with great greediness, when Partridge came into the kitchen.
I'm busy looking after the land," answered Konstantin, watching with horror the greediness with which his brother ate and drank, and trying to conceal that he noticed it.
Here he by no means diminished the impression he had just produced, for he ate hard eggs, shell and all, devoured gigantic prawns with the heads and tails on, chewed tobacco and water-cresses at the same time and with extraordinary greediness, drank boiling tea without winking, bit his fork and spoon till they bent again, and in short performed so many horrifying and uncommon acts that the women were nearly frightened out of their wits, and began to doubt if he were really a human creature.
But first of all, with five or six buckets of water (for as regard the number of buckets there is some dispute), he washed his head and face, and still the water remained whey-coloured, thanks to Sancho's greediness and purchase of those unlucky curds that turned his master so white.
Heretofore the Swedes had always watched near-by their trap, for as a rule only the stronger bulls are thus caught, since in their greediness they prevent the weaker from approaching the covered bait, and when once within the ordinary rude trap woven on the spot of interlaced branches they are able, with the aid of their friends upon the outside, to demolish their prison and escape.
Certainly, it is wrong," said Monte Cristo, "but you should take into consideration the youth and greediness of the delinquent.