green ban


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green ban

n
(Environmental Science) Austral a trade union ban on any development that might be considered harmful to the environment
References in periodicals archive ?
Saving our post office THE Green Ban Action Committee has campaigned for a year and a half to halt the destruction of Birmingham's Victoria Square Post Office and stop the building of a massive office complex in its place.
Along the way, McQueen explores the struggle to build one effective building industry union; the often nomadic, hard-bitten lifestyle of men (few women were involved, other than in New South Wales during the heady Green Ban days), as they followed the job or drifted in-and-out of the industry through boom and bust; the personality clashes and the disputes, great and small, that shaped the BLF in each of the States and the ACT; the struggles to rid the union of gangsters and right-wing bosses-men; and, among a plethora of other considerations, the participation and impact of the various nationalities that went into making the BLF.
The other green bans thwarted development projects affecting entire suburbs, such as the historic housing of The Rocks, the site of the first British settlement from 1788, which only a green ban saved from demolition and replacement by high-rise office blocks.
Mundey and his union promptly placed a green ban on the scheme, which effectively ended the project.
Another leading nonprofit, Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA), likes Herbal Armor, Buzz Away and Green Ban, each containing citronella and peppermint as well as various essential oils (cedar wood, lemongrass, etc.
The context in which the best-known Australian green ban struggles occurred (where workers refused to work on projects that are held to be anti-environmental) strongly resembles the current context of widespread gentrification ("regeneration") of working-class areas.
Citronella-based products, such as Natrapel, Green Ban for People and Buzz Away, lasted anywhere from 13 minutes to 20 minutes.
The Green Ban group has a language unique unto themselves, and they all appear able to understand and use it with ease in order to communicate with each other.
The book includes 18 pages of appendices listing selected green ban sites of the 1970s and key events in the conservation movement in Australia and internationally.
Jack Mundey spoke alongside Verity and Meredith Burgmann in a session celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first Green Ban.
Kingstanding police also failed to send a representative to propose the Stockland Green ban covering the Marsh Lane and Short Heath after Sgt Kirsty Morrin requested a ban.
The book also conveys a sense of the highly-charged atmosphere that coalesced around the green ban movement.