greenhouse effect

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greenhouse effect
Energy radiated by the sun converts to heat when it reaches the earth. Some heat is reflected back through the atmosphere, while some is absorbed by atmospheric gases and radiated back to the earth.

greenhouse effect

n.
A phenomenon in which the atmosphere of a planet traps radiation emitted by its sun, caused by gases such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, and methane that allow incoming sunlight to pass through but retain heat radiated back from the planet's surface.

greenhouse effect

n
1. (General Physics) an effect occurring in greenhouses, etc, in which radiant heat from the sun passes through the glass warming the contents, the radiant heat from inside being trapped by the glass
2. (Physical Geography) the application of this effect to a planet's atmosphere; carbon dioxide and some other gases in the planet's atmosphere can absorb the infrared radiation emitted by the planet's surface as a result of exposure to solar radiation, thus increasing the mean temperature of the planet

green′house effect`


n.
heating of the atmosphere resulting from the absorption by certain gases of solar energy that has been captured and reradiated by the earth's surface.
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green·house effect

(grēn′hous′)
The trapping of the sun's radiation in the Earth's atmosphere due to the presence of greenhouse gases.

greenhouse effect

1. The term given to the heating of the Earth’s surface caused by infrared radiation trapped in the atmosphere.
2. Alleged human-made atmospheric warming by accumulating gases trapping solar heat below them rather like a greenhouse roof. See greenhouse gases.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.greenhouse effect - warming that results when solar radiation is trapped by the atmospheregreenhouse effect - warming that results when solar radiation is trapped by the atmosphere; caused by atmospheric gases that allow sunshine to pass through but absorb heat that is radiated back from the warmed surface of the earth
atmospheric phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the atmosphere
Translations
تَأثير الدَّفيئَه
skleníkový efekt
drivhuseffekt
üvegházhatás
skleníkový efekt
ser etkisi

greenhouse effect

n the greenhouse effectl'effetto serra

green

(griːn) adjective
1. of the colour of growing grass or the leaves of most plants. a green hat.
2. not ripe. green bananas.
3. without experience. Only someone as green as you would believe a story like that.
4. looking as if one is about to be sick; very pale. He was green with envy (= very jealous).
noun
1. the colour of grass or the leaves of plants. the green of the trees in summer.
2. something (eg paint) green in colour. I've used up all my green.
3. an area of grass. a village green.
4. an area of grass on a golf course with a small hole in the centre.
5. concerned with the protection of the environment. green issues; a green political party.
ˈgreenish adjective
close to green. a greenish dress.
greens noun plural
green vegetables. Children are often told that they must eat their greens.
ˈgreenflyplural ˈgreenfly noun
a type of small, green insect. The leaves of this rose tree have been eaten by greenfly.
ˈgreengage (-geidʒ) noun
a greenish-yellow type of plum.
ˈgreengrocer noun
a person who sells fruit and vegetables.
ˈgreenhouse noun
a building usually of glass, in which plants are grown.
ˈgreenhouse effect noun
(singular) the gradual heating of the atmosphere caused by air pollution which traps energy from the sun.
the green light
permission to begin. We can't start until he gives us the green light.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the presence of channels and extensive valley networks, mainstream theorists have suggested a "wet" early Mars - - warmed by atmospheric greenhouse effects, bathed in thunder-showers, and dusted by snowstorms.
But farmers and beachfront dwellers aren't the only individuals likely to suffer directly from greenhouse effects, scientists reported last week.