grenadier


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

gren·a·dier

 (grĕn′ə-dîr′)
n.
1.
a. A member of the British Grenadier Guards, the first regiment of the royal household infantry.
b. A soldier who is a member of a special corps or regiment.
c. A soldier equipped with grenades.
2. Any of various deep-sea fishes of the family Macrouridae, having a long tapering tail and lacking a tail fin. Also called rat-tail.

[French, from grenade, grenade; see grenade.]

grenadier

(ˌɡrɛnəˈdɪə)
n
1. (Military) military
a. (in the British Army) a member of the senior regiment of infantry in the Household Brigade
b. (formerly) a member of a special formation, usually selected for strength and height
c. (formerly) a soldier trained to throw grenades
2. (Animals) Also called: rat-tail any deep-sea gadoid fish of the family Macrouridae, typically having a large head and trunk and a long tapering tail
3. (Animals) any of various African weaverbirds of the genus Estrilda. See waxbill
[C17: from French]

gren•a•dier

(ˌgrɛn əˈdɪər)

n.
1. a member of the first regiment of royal household infantry (Gren′adier Guards′) in the British Army.
2. a foot soldier in certain former elite units, specially selected for strength and courage.
3. (formerly) a soldier who threw grenades.
4. any deep-sea fish of the family Macrouridae, having an elongated, tapering tail.
[1670–80; < French; see grenade, -ier2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grenadier - an infantryman equipped with grenadesgrenadier - an infantryman equipped with grenades
foot soldier, footslogger, infantryman, marcher - fights on foot with small arms
2.grenadier - deep-sea fish with a large head and body and long tapering tail
gadoid, gadoid fish - a soft-finned fish of the family Gadidae
Translations

grenadier

[ˌgrenəˈdɪəʳ] Ngranadero m

grenadier

nGrenadier m
References in classic literature ?
One, two--get out of the way," cried a colossal grenadier.
Look at the sailor, called the mincer, who now comes along, and assisted by two allies, heavily backs the grandissimus, as the mariners call it, and with bowed shoulders, staggers off with it as if he were a grenadier carrying a dead comrade from the field.
Phileas Fogg was seated squarely in his armchair, his feet close together like those of a grenadier on parade, his hands resting on his knees, his body straight, his head erect; he was steadily watching a complicated clock which indicated the hours, the minutes, the seconds, the days, the months, and the years.
He was permitted to pass the grenadier, who watched over the slumbers of the French commander, without interruption, the man making the usual salute which betokens military deference, as the other passed swiftly through the little city of tents, in the direction of William Henry.
When the centinel first saw our heroe approach, his hair began gently to lift up his grenadier cap; and in the same instant his knees fell to blows with each other.
Tom humbly held the door for her, and she marched out as grim and erect as a grenadier.
A respectable lady, built on the lines of a Pomeranian grenadier, burst into the dressing-room and dropped groaning into a vacant arm-chair.
The grenadiers of the two regiments got near enough to the ditches and intrenchments to launch their grenades, which had but small effect.
COULD you give us 'British Grenadiers,' my fine fellow?
And there, to my great pleasure and wonder, I beheld a regiment marching to the fifes, every foot in time; an old red-faced general on a grey horse at the one end, and at the other the company of Grenadiers, with their Pope's-hats.
Patrols of soldiers--here no longer hussars, but grenadiers in white--were warning people to move now or to take refuge in their cellars as soon as the firing began.
Before the doors of these pretending dwellings were placed a few saplings, either without branches or possessing only the feeble shoots of one or two summers’ growth, that looked not unlike tall grenadiers on post near the threshold of princes.