grevillea

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grevillea

(ɡrəˈvɪljə)
n
(Plants) any of a large variety of evergreen trees and shrubs that comprise the genus Grevillea, native to Australia, Tasmania, and New Caledonia: family Proteaceae
[named after C. F. Greville (1749–1809), a founder of the Royal Horticultural Society]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grevillea - any shrub or tree of the genus Grevilleagrevillea - any shrub or tree of the genus Grevillea
genus Grevillea - large genus of Australian shrubs and trees having usually showy orange or red flowers
silk oak - any of several Australian timber trees having usually fernlike foliage and mottled wood used in cabinetry and veneering
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
References in periodicals archive ?
As for fertilizing, grevilleas are part of the protea family, which means they don't like phosphorous.
of subtribe Hakeinae with any confidence, although there are some leaves (lacking cuticle) that appear similar to some grevilleas in leaf form and venation (McLoughlin & Hill, 1996; Pole & Bowman, 1996; Carpenter & Jordan, 1997; Carpenter et al.
Iris, geums, potentillas, roses, libertia and grevilleas all feature, some easily grown.
The site was sensitive due to priority listed flora including grasses and grevilleas that generally only occur on the target iron formations.
My study of the holly grevilleas is just one example of evolution-related research currently being conducted in the Systematics Laboratory in the School of Botany at The University of Melbourne.
Grevilleas are truly made for intimate gardens, but not necessarily for large-scale landscapes.
Some farmers are undertaking high intensity revegetation with eucalypts and casuarinas, with an understorey of acacias and grevilleas, while others are revegetating on a smaller scale, or not at all.
Wander on a self-guided tour among banksias, grevilleas, proteas, and other plants from Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, many of which are low-water growers.
In a bid to preserve wild macadamia varieties (relatives of banksias, grevilleas and hakeas) `gene banks' or plantations have been established at three sites: Caboolture and Tiaro in Queensland, and Alstonville in New South Wales.
warning when it comes to caring for grevilleas in the garden.