greybeard


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greybeard

(ˈɡreɪˌbɪəd) or

graybeard

n
1. an old man, esp a sage
2. (Ceramics) a large stoneware or earthenware jar or jug for spirits
ˈgreyˌbearded, ˈgrayˌbearded adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.greybeard - a man who is very oldgreybeard - a man who is very old    
codger, old codger - used affectionately to refer to an eccentric but amusing old man
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
patriarch - a man who is older and higher in rank than yourself
2.greybeard - a stoneware drinking jug with a long neckgreybeard - a stoneware drinking jug with a long neck; decorated with a caricature of Cardinal Bellarmine (17th century)
jug - a large bottle with a narrow mouth
Translations

greybeard

graybeard (US) [ˈgreɪbɪəd] N (liter) → anciano m, viejo m

greybeard

[ˈgreɪˌbɪəd] nvecchio
References in classic literature ?
Bowed and sighing the greybeard wends Alone to the mart where sighing ends.
A greybeard wagged over the bulwark, and a thick voice yelled something Harvey could not understand.
among sea-commanders, the old greybeards will oftenest leave their berths to visit the night-cloaked deck.
Even elderly matrons and greybeards with a foot in the grave screeched and shrilled their joy in the spectacle.
Kim cleared his throat and looked around at the village greybeards.
The UK's branch of the worldwide Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has paid a special tribute to the late John Honeywell, who wrote this column for many years under the Captain Greybeard byline.
Old Greybeard may have been a divisive figure but English football needs men who speak their mind.
Doreen Walsh's Foxford Hi There comprehensively won the battle for an early lead in heat two and, with the strong finishers getting too far behind, the July 06 greybeard was never troubled to land the heat in 31.
I ASKED my colleague Captain Greybeard and he recommended two: Gap Adventures (www.
I doubt a legal greybeard the age of Bill Paterson would really have such a wild passion for his job that he in flames his duodenal ulcer at every turn.
THIS striking pottery jug was known as a greybeard when it first appeared in 17th-century Britain - but these days it's more likely to be called a bellarmine.
Perhaps our next "typical" veteran will not be a grizzled greybeard, but a grandmotherly type who has shred the traditional strings.