grievance


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Related to grievance: grievance procedure

griev·ance

 (grē′vəns)
n.
1.
a. An actual or supposed circumstance regarded as just cause for complaint.
b. A complaint or protestation based on such a circumstance: The warden addressed the inmates' grievances.
2. Indignation or resentment stemming from a feeling of having been wronged.
3. Obsolete
a. The act of inflicting hardship or harm.
b. The cause of hardship or harm.

[Middle English grevaunce, from Old French grevance, from grever, to harm; see grieve.]

grievance

(ˈɡriːvəns)
n
1. a real or imaginary wrong causing resentment and regarded as grounds for complaint
2. a feeling of resentment or injustice at having been unfairly treated
3. obsolete affliction or hardship
[C15 grevance, from Old French, from grever to grieve1]

griev•ance

(ˈgri vəns)

n.
1. a wrong considered as grounds for complaint.
2. a complaint or resentment, as against an unjust act.
3. Obs. the act of inflicting a wrong.
[1250–1300; < Old French]

Grievance

 

ax to grind A private or selfish motive, a personal stake; a grievance or complaint, especially a chronic one. The phrase stems from an 1810 story by Charles Miner in which a gullible boy is duped by a flattering stranger into turning a grindstone for him. According to the Dictionary of Americanisms, the frequent but erroneous ascription of the phrase’s origin to Benjamin Franklin is due to confusion between Poor Richard’s Almanac and Essays from the Desk of Poor Robert the Scribe, the collection in which the story appeared.

a bone to pick A complaint or grievance; a point of disagreement or a difference to settle. Formerly, the expression have a bone to pick meant to be occupied, as a dog is with a bone. It was used in this sense as early as 1565. The similar French phrase uses a different metaphor, une maille à partir ‘a knot to pick.’

a chip on one’s shoulder See BELLIGERENCE.

grumble in the gizzard To complain or grouse, to be dissatisfied or annoyed. In this British expression, which dates from the late 17th century, gizzard ‘a bird’s stomach’ is applied jocularly to a human being’s throat or craw.

I was going home, grumbling in the gizzard. (Thomas Flloyd, Gueul-Jette’s Tartarian Tales, translated 1764)

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grievance - a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation; "holding a grudge"; "settling a score"
bitterness, rancor, rancour, resentment, gall - a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
2.grievance - an allegation that something imposes an illegal obligation or denies some legal right or causes injustice
allegation - (law) a formal accusation against somebody (often in a court of law); "an allegation of malpractice"
3.grievance - a complaint about a (real or imaginary) wrong that causes resentment and is grounds for action
complaint - an expression of grievance or resentment

grievance

noun
1. complaint, protest, beef (slang), gripe (informal), axe to grind, chip on your shoulder (informal) They felt they had a legitimate grievance.
2. injustice, wrong, injury a deep sense of grievance

grievance

noun
An expression of dissatisfaction or a circumstance regarded as a cause for such expression:
Informal: gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef, kick.
Idiom: bone to pick.
Translations
مَظْلَمَه، شَكْوى
důvod ke stížnosti
klagepunkt
umkvörtunarefni
sūdzība
dôvod na sťažnosť
şikâyet nedeni

grievance

[ˈgriːvəns]
A. N (= complaint) → queja f; (= cause for complaint) → motivo m de queja; [of workers] → reivindicación f
to have a grievance against sbtener queja de algn
B. CPD grievance procedure Nsistema m de trámite de quejas

grievance

[ˈgriːvəns] n
(= feeling) → doléance f, grief m
to harbour a grievance → garder rancune
(= cause for complaint) → grief m
She has a genuine grievance → Ses griefs sont justifiés.

grievance

nKlage f; (= resentment)Groll m; grievance procedureBeschwerdeweg m; I’ve no grievance against him (= no cause for complaint)ich habe an ihm nichts auszusetzen; (= no resentment)ich nehme ihm nichts übel; to have a grievance against somebody for somethingjdm etw übel nehmen; to air one’s grievancesseine Beschwerden vorbringen, sich offen beschweren, sich beklagen

grievance

[ˈgriːvns] n (complaint) → lagnanza, rimostranza; (cause for complaint) → motivo di risentimento

grievance

(ˈgriːvəns) noun
a cause or reason for complaint. a list of grievances.

grievance

n. queja; agravio.
References in classic literature ?
Flora has now her grievance, and she'll work it to the end.
He was the sort of man the bosses like to get hold of, the sort they make it a grievance they cannot get hold of.
This principle being admitted, the justice of every particular case of resistance is reduced to a computation of the quantity of the danger and grievance on the one side, and of the probability and expense of redressing it on the other.
Everybody had a narrative and a grievance, and none were reasonable about it, but all in an offensive and ungovernable state.
Had it taken place only once a year, it would have been a grievance.
The old well-established grievance of duty against will, parent against child, was the cause of all.
She did not comprehend it; and hard work I had to obtain a promise that she would not lay the grievance before her father.
He had been too full of his own grievance to keep it out of his first letter to Magdalen.
He took her on his knee again, but it was some time before it occurred to Silas's dull bachelor mind that the wet boots were the grievance, pressing on her warm ankles.
A most sensible grievance of those aggrieved times were the Forest Laws.
You remind me of a story Harry told me about a certain philanthropist who spent twenty years of his life in trying to get some grievance redressed, or some unjust law altered--I forget exactly what it was.
In fact, he had but one grievance, which was that none of his four wives had given him an heir.