grieved


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grieve

 (grēv)
v. grieved, griev·ing, grieves
v.tr.
1. To cause to be sorrowful; distress: It grieves me to see you in such pain.
2. To mourn or sorrow for: We grieved the death of our pastor.
3. Usage Problem To file an official or formal grievance on account of (an actual or perceived injustice).
4. Archaic To hurt or harm.
v.intr.
To experience or express grief.

[Middle English greven, from Old French grever, to harm, from Latin gravāre, to burden, from gravis, heavy; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots.]

griev′er n.
Synonyms: grieve, lament, mourn, sorrow
These verbs mean to feel, show, or express grief, sadness, or regret: grieved over her father's death; lamenting about the decline in academic standards; mourns for lost hopes; sorrowed for a lost friend.
Antonym: rejoice
Usage Note: Traditionally, grieve as a transitive verb has meant "to cause to be sorrowful; distress," with its direct object being the person who is sorrowful or distressed, as in It grieves me to see so many homeless in the city. Later, there developed a sense of grieve in which the direct object is that which causes sorrow or distress, as in She took a week off to attend her father's funeral and grieve his loss. In our 2013 survey, 79 percent of the Usage Panel approved of this usage in this sentence, up from 62 percent in our 1996 survey. More recently, grieve has also come to be used to mean "to file an official or formal grievance." This extended sense does not find favor with the Usage Panel. In 2013, only 21 percent found its use in this passage acceptable: Saradnik was asked to resign as coach following complaints by several parents. Because Saradnik has grieved his dismissal, school officials aren't commenting. This usage is relatively uncommon outside of the sphere of labor and management disputes.
Translations

grieved

[griːvd] ADJ [tone etc] → lastimoso, apenado
References in classic literature ?
March looked grave and grieved, and Amy felt that no one would love her till she had asked pardon for the act which she now regretted more than any of them.
I should be grieved to think," continued Duncan, speaking slowly, and using the simplest French of which he was the master, "to believe that none of this wise and brave nation understand the language that the'Grand Monarque' uses when he talks to his children.
But then the elf-child sighed, and gave up her sport, because it grieved her to have done harm to a little being that was as wild as the sea-breeze, or as wild as Pearl herself.
Indeed, in some sort, they were not grieved at this event, at least as a portent; for they regarded it, not as a foreshadowing of evil in the future, but as the fulfilment of an evil already presaged.
Master rode me home slowly, and I could tell by his voice how the thing had grieved him.
The boy wondered and grieved that she could not eat; and when, putting his arms round her neck, he tried to wedge some of his cake into her mouth, it seemed to her that the rising in her throat would choke her.
Then he shook his head and said, in a grieved voice:
Then the old man cried and grieved, and said he was a murderer and the mark of Cain was on him, and he had disgraced his family and was going to be found out and hung.
It would have grieved me to lose your acquaintance, which must have been the consequence of your marrying Mr.