grockle

grockle

(ˈɡrɒkəl)
n
dialect Southwest English a tourist, esp one from the Midlands or the North of England
[C20: of unknown origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
She falls foul of two influential classmates, Clare and Ella, is labelled a stuck-up grockle, and is mercilessly bullied.
GROCKLE WE WERE overrun in midfield for much of the second half but hung on for a massive, massive victory.
After Korky, Desperate Dan and Keyhole Kate, kids met Jimmy and His Grockle, an amiable little dragon, "The queerest beast to walk on land, Jimmy's Grockle beats the band.
His attention was caught by a tiny shop window full of trinkets and tourist-catchers, a grockle shop they called it at home, and in spite of the urgency imparted by Faulds, he stooped for a closer look.
In the week leading up to Christmas, entertainers Bo Clown, Dame Dilly Grockle, SnoBo and balloon artists Christmas Crackers and Krazy Kev will mingle with shoppers in South Shields, Jarrow and Hebburn.
In that first Dandy, after finishing with Korky, Dan and Keyhole Kate, you met Jimmy and his Grockle.
IFthe gentleman in your joke was visiting Devon he would indeed be a grockle but as he was in Cornwall he would be an emmet.
If snobby grockles want to enjoy the beauty they have to make do with what's around.
Crawford Logan was the characterful reciter, his overmiking unbalancing the sound-picture, and drawing too much attention to these verses (one of which, describing a visit to the local tip which could be happening anywhere, seemed inappropriate) which could possibly be offensive to genuine foresters refusing to be patronised by incoming grockles.
I think this is deliberate - a cunning way to deter grockles by making the British seaside appear so dull that townies will stay at home.
The whole tacky world of modern seaside tourism--tower blocks on the Costas, handkerchief-headed grockles in deckchairs with their feet in the briney--is completely absent: this is maritime social romanticism, not social realism.
It rained on Cardiff and Bridgend, also Neath and Swansea, and as we approached Llanelli - a town so named to enable the Welsh to tell visiting grockles "that is not how you pronounce the place" - it rained with increased urgency.