grog


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

grog

 (grŏg)
n.
1. An alcoholic liquor, especially rum diluted with water.
2. A rum cocktail, especially when heated and made with lemon or lime juice, sugar, and cinnamon.

[After Old Grog, nickname of Edward Vernon (1684-1757), British admiral who ordered that diluted rum be served to his sailors, from grogram (from his habit of wearing a grogram cloak).]

grog

(ɡrɒɡ)
n
1. (Brewing) diluted spirit, usually rum, as an alcoholic drink
2. (Brewing) informal chiefly Austral and NZ alcoholic drink in general, esp spirits
[C18: from Old Grog, nickname of Edward Vernon (1684–1757), British admiral, who in 1740 issued naval rum diluted with water; his nickname arose from his grogram cloak]

grog

(grɒg)

n.
1. a mixture of rum and water, often flavored with lemon, sugar, and spices and sometimes served hot.
2. any alcoholic drink.
[1760–70; from Old Grog (alluding to his grogram cloak), the nickname of Edward Vernon (d. 1757), British admiral, who in 1740 ordered the mixture to be served, instead of pure spirits, to sailors]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grog - rum cut with watergrog - rum cut with water      
rum - liquor distilled from fermented molasses
Translations
grogi
grog

grog

[grɒg] Ngrog m

grog

[ˈgrɒg] ngrog m

grog

nGrog m

grog

[grɒg] ngrog m inv
References in classic literature ?
They sang in the church all the morning, and drank grog in the orchard all the afternoon.
and then, over a glass of Yarmouth grog, we will have the tidings of ten years
He keeps his grog ready-mixed in a little tub on the table.
I quite understood their drift, and after a stiff glass of strong grog, or rather more of the same, and with each a sovereign in hand, they made light of the attack, and swore that they would encounter a worse madman any day for the pleasure of meeting so `bloomin' good a bloke' as your correspondent.
Captain Bonneville, who was delighted with the game look of these cavaliers of the mountains, welcomed them heartily to his camp, and ordered a free allowance of grog to regale them, which soon put them in the most braggart spirits.
He could manage to find his way into his berth, light his lamp, get into his bed - ay, and get out of it when I called him at half-past five, the first man on deck, lifting the cup of morning coffee to his lips with a steady hand, ready for duty as though he had virtuously slept ten solid hours - a better chief officer than many a man who had never tasted grog in his life.
It is true that, now and then, when he had been a little heated by an extra glass of grog, he had been heard to say of Hetty that the "lass was well enough," and that "a man might do worse"; but on convivial occasions men are apt to express themselves strongly.
Well, then, d’ye see, I larnt how a topmast should be slushed, and how a topgallant-sail was to be becketted; and then I did small jobs in the cabin, such as mixing the skipper’s grog.
Her dejection had no abatement from anything passing around her; a friend or two of her father's, as always happened if he was not with them, spent the long, long evening there; and from six o'clock till half-past nine, there was little intermission of noise or grog.
He served out some grog with a liberal hand, And bade them sit down on the beach: And they could not but own that their Captain looked grand, As he stood and delivered his speech.
The day was devoted to games of agility and strength, and other amusements; and grog was temperately distributed, together with bread, butter, and cheese.
The first night the sailors of a British ship, being happy with grog, came down on the pier and challenged our sailors to a free fight.