grotesque


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gro·tesque

 (grō-tĕsk′)
adj.
1. Characterized by ludicrous, repulsive, or incongruous distortion, as of appearance or manner. See Synonyms at ugly.
2. Outlandish or bizarre, as in character or appearance. See Synonyms at fantastic.
3. Of, relating to, or being the grotesque style in art or a work executed in this style.
n.
1. One that is grotesque.
2.
a. A style of painting, sculpture, and ornamentation in which natural forms and monstrous figures are intertwined in bizarre or fanciful combinations.
b. A work of art executed in this style.

[From French, a fanciful style of decorative art, from Italian grottesca, from feminine of grottesco, of a grotto, from grotta, grotto; see grotto.]

gro·tesque′ly adv.
gro·tesque′ness n.

grotesque

(ɡrəʊˈtɛsk)
adj
1. strangely or fantastically distorted; bizarre: a grotesque reflection in the mirror.
2. (Art Terms) of or characteristic of the grotesque in art
3. absurdly incongruous; in a ludicrous context: a grotesque turn of phrase.
n
4. (Art Terms) a 16th-century decorative style in which parts of human, animal, and plant forms are distorted and mixed
5. (Art Terms) a decorative device, as in painting or sculpture, in this style
6. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing the family of 19th-century sans serif display types
7. any grotesque person or thing
[C16: from French, from Old Italian (pittura) grottesca cave painting, from grottesco of a cave, from grotta cave; see grotto]
groˈtesquely adv
groˈtesqueness n

gro•tesque

(groʊˈtɛsk)

adj.
1. odd or unnatural in shape, appearance, or character; fantastically ugly or absurd; bizarre.
2. fantastic in the shaping and combination of forms, as in decorative work combining incongruous human and animal figures with scrolls, foliage, etc.
n.
3. a grotesque object, design, person, or thing.
[1555–65; < French < Italian grottesco (as n., grottesca grotesque decoration such as was appar. found in excavated dwellings), derivative of grotta. See grotto, -esque]
gro•tesque′ly, adv.
gro•tesque′ness, n.
syn: See fantastic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grotesque - art characterized by an incongruous mixture of parts of humans and animals interwoven with plantsgrotesque - art characterized by an incongruous mixture of parts of humans and animals interwoven with plants
art, fine art - the products of human creativity; works of art collectively; "an art exhibition"; "a fine collection of art"
Adj.1.grotesque - distorted and unnatural in shape or sizegrotesque - distorted and unnatural in shape or size; abnormal and hideous; "tales of grotesque serpents eight fathoms long that churned the seas"; "twisted into monstrous shapes"
ugly - displeasing to the senses; "an ugly face"; "ugly furniture"
2.grotesque - ludicrously oddgrotesque - ludicrously odd; "Hamlet's assumed antic disposition"; "fantastic Halloween costumes"; "a grotesque reflection in the mirror"
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"

grotesque

adjective
1. unnatural, bizarre, weird, odd, strange, fantastic, distorted, fanciful, deformed, outlandish, whimsical, freakish, misshapen, malformed statues of grotesque mythical creatures
unnatural natural, normal
2. absurd, ridiculous, ludicrous, preposterous, incongruous the grotesque disparities between the rich and the poor
absurd natural, normal

grotesque

adjective
1. Resembling a freak:
2. Conceived or done with no reference to reality or common sense:
Translations
غَريب الشَّكْل
groteskní
grotesk
groteski
groteszk
furîulegur, fáránlegur, kynlegur
groteskiškai
grotesks

grotesque

[grəʊˈtesk]
A. ADJ
1. (= hideous) [appearance, idea, sight, spectacle] → grotesco; [allegation, proposal] → absurdo
2. (Art) → grotesco
B. Ngrotesco m

grotesque

[grəʊˈtɛsk] adj
[idea, behaviour] → grotesque
(= ugly) → grotesque

grotesque

adj
(= outlandish, ridiculous) sight, spectacle, shapegrotesk; idea, proposal, allegationabsurd
(= distorted) grimaceverzerrt; the body was in a grotesque positionder Körper lag völlig verzerrt da; he was rather grotesque to look atseine Erscheinung wirkte grotesk
(Art) → grotesk
n
(Art) the grotesquedie Groteske
(Typ) → Grotesk f

grotesque

[grəʊˈtɛsk] adjgrottesco/a

grotesque

(grəˈtesk) adjective
very strange-looking. a grotesque figure.
groˈtesquely adverb
References in classic literature ?
In the end he wrote a book which he called "The Book of the Grotesque.
Edna began to feel like one who awakens gradually out of a dream, a delicious, grotesque, impossible dream, to feel again the realities pressing into her soul.
It was impossible to discover the expression of his features through the grotesque mask of paint under which they were concealed, though Duncan fancied it was rather melancholy than savage.
Hepzibah brought out Some old silver spoons with the family crest upon them, and a china tea-set painted over with grotesque figures of man, bird, and beast, in as grotesque a landscape.
The vulgar, who, in those dreary old times, were always contributing a grotesque horror to what interested their imaginations, had a story about the scarlet letter which we might readily work up into a terrific legend.
In an apartment of the great temple of Denderah, some fifty years ago, there was discovered upon the granite ceiling a sculptured and painted planisphere, abounding in centaurs, griffins, and dolphins, similar to the grotesque figures on the celestial globe of the moderns.
He had on a long-tailed black coat, worn green at the seams and the buttonholes; his eyes must have been weak, for he wore green spectacles that gave him a grotesque appearance.
The boy commenced one of those wild, grotesque songs common among the negroes, in a rich, clear voice, accompanying his singing with many comic evolutions of the hands, feet, and whole body, all in perfect time to the music.
Even down to my birth-century that poison was still in the blood of Christendom, and the best of English com- moners was still content to see his inferiors impudently continuing to hold a number of positions, such as lord- ships and the throne, to which the grotesque laws of his country did not allow him to aspire; in fact, he was not merely contented with this strange condition of things, he was even able to persuade himself that he was proud of it.
We visited the principal church, also--a curious old structure, with a towerlike spire adorned with all sorts of grotesque images.
He kept up this grotesque foolishness for some time; but by-and-by, while he was in the midst of some dangerous gymnastic performances, he glanced aside and saw that the little girl was wending her way toward the house.
I was still looking at them, and also at intervals examining the teachers--none of whom precisely pleased me; for the stout one was a little coarse, the dark one not a little fierce, the foreigner harsh and grotesque, and Miss Miller, poor thing