grotto


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grot·to

 (grŏt′ō)
n. pl. grot·toes or grot·tos
1. A small cave or cavern.
2. An artificial structure or excavation made to resemble a cave or cavern.

[Alteration of Italian grotta, from Vulgar Latin *grupta, from Latin crypta, vault; see crypt.]

grotto

(ˈɡrɒtəʊ)
n, pl -toes or -tos
1. (Physical Geography) a small cave, esp one with attractive features
2. (Architecture) a construction in the form of a cave, esp as in landscaped gardens during the 18th century
[C17: from Old Italian grotta, from Late Latin crypta vault; see crypt]

grot•to

(ˈgrɒt oʊ)

n., pl. -toes, -tos.
1. a cave or cavern.
2. an artificial cavernlike recess or structure.
[1610–20; < Italian grotta « Latin crypta subterranean passage, chamber. See crypt]
grot′toed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grotto - a small cave (usually with attractive features)grotto - a small cave (usually with attractive features)
cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea

grotto

noun cave, tunnel, hollow, cavern, underground chamber Water trickles through an underground grotto.

grotto

noun
A hollow beneath the earth's surface:
Translations
grottajeskyňka
grotte
luola
caverna

grotto

[ˈgrɒtəʊ] N (grottos or grottoes (pl)) → gruta f

grotto

[ˈgrɒtəʊ] ngrotte f
Santa's grotto → grotte du père Noël

grotto

n pl <-(e)s> → Grotte f, → Höhle f; fairy grottoMärchenhöhle f; Santa’s grotto Raum, in dem der Weihnachtsmann in Kaufhäusern etc auftritt

grotto

[ˈgrɒtəʊ] ngrotta
References in classic literature ?
It seemed, however, to Edmond, who was hidden from his comrades by the inequalities of the ground, that at sixty paces from the harbor the marks ceased; nor did they terminate at any grotto.
He ascended into grottos paved with emeralds, with panels of rubies, and the roof glowing with diamond stalactites.
Meanwhile, by a cleft between two walls of rock, following a path worn by a torrent, and which, in all human probability, human foot had never before trod, Dantes approached the spot where he supposed the grottos must have existed.
And thus the wonderful Blue Grotto is suggested to me.
Nero's Baths, the ruins of Baiae, the Temple of Serapis; Cumae, where the Cumaen Sybil interpreted the oracles, the Lake Agnano, with its ancient submerged city still visible far down in its depths--these and a hundred other points of interest we examined with critical imbecility, but the Grotto of the Dog claimed our chief attention, because we had heard and read so much about it.
We passed the night in a grotto hollowed in the snow, which afforded us but poor shelter, and I was ill all night.
My friends' launch cast us loose just below the grotto, and then Harris wanted to make out that it was my turn to pull.
As to how we spent our time during the afternoon, all I need say is that Rouletabille led me to the grotto of Sainte-Genevieve, and, all the time, talked of every subject but the one in which we were most interested.
At this moment there opened before us a large grotto dug in a picturesque heap of rocks and carpeted with all the thick warp of the submarine flora.
Anyhow, she left it almost finished in the Grotto of the Calvary at the Capuccini Hotel at Amalfi while she went for a little ink.
On the under story, towards the garden, let it be turned to a grotto, or a place of shade, or estivation.
which were regarded as wonderful in 1653, are still so, even at the present time; the cascades awakened the admiration of kings and princes; and as for the famous grotto, the theme of so many poetical effusions, the residence of that illustrious nymph of Vaux, whom Pelisson made converse with La Fontaine, we must be spared the description of all its beauties.