grounding

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ground 1

 (ground)
n.
1.
a. The solid surface of the earth.
b. The floor of a body of water, especially the sea.
2. Soil; earth: level the ground for a lawn.
3. often grounds An area of land designated for a particular purpose: a burial ground; parade grounds.
4. often grounds The land surrounding or forming part of a house or another building: a guesthouse on the grounds of the mansion.
5. An area or a position that is contested in or as if in battle: The soldiers held their ground against the enemy. Character witnesses helped the defendant stand her ground in the trial.
6. Something that serves as a foundation or means of attachment for something else: a ground of white paint under the mural.
7. A surrounding area; a background.
8. often grounds The foundation for an argument, belief, or action; a basis.
9. often grounds The underlying condition prompting an action; a cause: grounds for suspicion; a ground for divorce. See Synonyms at base1.
10. An area of reference or discussion; a subject: The professor covered new ground in every lecture.
11. grounds
a. The sediment at or from the bottom of a liquid: coffee grounds.
b. Particles of ground coffee beans for use in making coffee for drinking.
12. Electricity
a. A large conducting body, such as the earth or an electric circuit connected to the earth, used as an arbitrary zero of potential.
b. A conducting object, such as a wire, that is connected to such a position of zero potential.
13. A mesh background upon which patterns are worked in lace-making.
v. ground·ed, ground·ing, grounds
v.tr.
1. To place on or cause to touch the ground.
2. To provide a basis for (a theory, for example); justify.
3. To supply with basic information; instruct in fundamentals.
4.
a. To prevent (an aircraft or a pilot) from flying.
b. Informal To restrict (someone) especially to a certain place as a punishment.
5. Electricity To connect (an electric circuit) to a ground.
6. Nautical To run (a vessel) aground.
7.
a. Baseball To hit (a ball) onto the ground.
b. Football To throw (a ball) to the ground in order to stop play and avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage.
v.intr.
1. To touch or reach the ground.
2. Baseball To hit a ground ball: grounded to the second baseman.
3. Nautical To run aground.
Phrasal Verb:
ground out Baseball
To be put out by hitting a ground ball that is fielded and thrown to first base.
Idioms:
drive/run into the ground
To belabor (an issue or a subject).
from the ground up
From the most basic level to the highest level; completely: designed the house from the ground up; learned the family business from the ground up.
off the ground
Under way, as if in flight: Because of legal difficulties, the construction project never got off the ground.
on (one's) own ground
In a situation where one has knowledge or competence: a sculptor back on her own ground after experiments with painting.
on the ground
At a place that is exciting, interesting, or important: a reporter who wanted to be on the ground when the story broke.
to ground
1. Into a den or burrow: a fox going to ground.
2. Into hiding.

[Middle English, from Old English grund.]

ground 2

 (ground)
v.
Past tense and past participle of grind.

grounding

(ˈɡraʊndɪŋ)
n
a basic knowledge of or training in a subject

grounding

The bonding of an equipment case, frame or chassis, to an object or vehicle structure to ensure a common potential. See also bonding; earthing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grounding - education or instruction in the fundamentals of a field of knowledge; "he lacks the foundation necessary for advanced study"; "a good grounding in mathematics"
education - knowledge acquired by learning and instruction; "it was clear that he had a very broad education"
2.grounding - fastening electrical equipment to earth
fastening, attachment - the act of fastening things together

grounding

noun coaching, schooling, teaching, instruction, education, guidance, tuition The degree provides a thorough grounding in both mathematics and statistics.
Translations
تأسيس، تعليم الأسُس
vyučování základům
grundviden
grunnur, kennsla
temel eğitim/öğretim

grounding

[ˈgraʊndɪŋ] N
1. (Naut) → varada f
2. (in education) → conocimientos mpl básicos
to give sb a grounding inenseñar a algn los rudimentos de

grounding

[ˈgraʊndɪŋ] n (in subject)connaissances fpl de base
a grounding in biology → des connaissances de base en biologie

grounding

n
(= basic knowledge)Grundwissen nt; to give somebody a grounding in Englishjdm die Grundlagen pldes Englischen beibringen
(Aviat, of plane) → Startverbot nt(of für); (due to strike, bad weather) → Hinderung fam Start; (of pilot)Sperren nt

grounding

[ˈgraʊndɪŋ] n (educational) → fondamento, basi fpl
he has a good grounding in French → ha delle buone basi in francese

ground2

(graund) noun
1. the solid surface of the Earth. lying on the ground; high ground.
2. a piece of land used for some purpose. a football ground.
verb
1. to base. His argument is grounded on a series of wrong assumptions.
2. to (cause a ship to) hit the seabed or shore and remain stuck.
3. to prevent (an aeroplane, pilot) from flying. All planes have been grounded because of the fog.
ˈgrounding noun
the teaching of the basic facts of a subject. a good grounding in mathematics.
ˈgroundless adjective
without reason. Your fears are groundless.
grounds noun plural
1. the garden or land round a large house etc. the castle grounds.
2. good reasons. Have you any grounds for calling him a liar?
3. the powder which remains in a cup (eg of coffee) which one has drunk. coffee grounds.
ground floor
the rooms of a building which are at street level. My office is on the ground floor; (also adjective) a ground-floor flat.
groundnutpeanutˈgroundwork noun
work done in preparation for beginning a project etc.
break new ground
to deal with a subject for the first time.
cover ground
to deal with a certain amount of work etc. We've covered a lot of ground at this morning's meeting.
get (something) off the ground
to get (a project etc) started.
hold one's ground
to refuse to move back or retreat when attacked. Although many were killed, the soldiers held their ground.
lose ground
to (be forced to) move back or retreat. The general sent in reinforcements when he saw that his troops were losing ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
Groundings account for 18% of the total number of ship losses (World Casualty Statistics 2007).
The largest number of groundings along the eastern coast of the Adriatic refers to smaller ships passing through the narrow passages between islands and between islands and the shore line.
Groundings are considered to be accidental loads and it is clear that the field of ship structures with respect for accidental loads could focus on highly varying topics.
A fundamental problem with rational consideration of groundings in rules is that there are no simple measures of a ships defense against these loads.
The results for the fourth quarter of 2008 include a special charge of USD23m for aircraft groundings, facility write-offs and severance related to capacity reductions and a non-cash pension settlement of USD103m.
Results for 2008 included the following special items, in addition to those reported in the fourth quarter: a USD432m gain from the sale of American Beacon Advisors; USD91m of facility, severance and aircraft grounding charges; and USD1.
Other recent FAA groundings have involved smaller companies.
Hinson said the FAA eventually would have found the problems with ValuJet that led to the grounding, even if the Everglades crash had never occurred.
The threat of hazardous spills resulting from vessel collisions and groundings along California's central coast was greatly reduced Wednesday, as the United Nations' International Maritime Organization finalized a U.
As a result of the groundings the carrier was forced to cancel 139 flights by Wednesday afternoon, according to Flightstats.
These groundings are in addition to the airline's previously announced decision to remove 25 DC-10-10 jets from its fleet -- 16 this year and nine by May of 1994.
Until this ordered grounding is lifted, all domestic and international air express deliveries will be affected.