grounds


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ground 1

 (ground)
n.
1.
a. The solid surface of the earth.
b. The floor of a body of water, especially the sea.
2. Soil; earth: level the ground for a lawn.
3. often grounds An area of land designated for a particular purpose: a burial ground; parade grounds.
4. often grounds The land surrounding or forming part of a house or another building: a guesthouse on the grounds of the mansion.
5. An area or a position that is contested in or as if in battle: The soldiers held their ground against the enemy. Character witnesses helped the defendant stand her ground in the trial.
6. Something that serves as a foundation or means of attachment for something else: a ground of white paint under the mural.
7. A surrounding area; a background.
8. often grounds The foundation for an argument, belief, or action; a basis.
9. often grounds The underlying condition prompting an action; a cause: grounds for suspicion; a ground for divorce. See Synonyms at base1.
10. An area of reference or discussion; a subject: The professor covered new ground in every lecture.
11. grounds
a. The sediment at or from the bottom of a liquid: coffee grounds.
b. Particles of ground coffee beans for use in making coffee for drinking.
12. Electricity
a. A large conducting body, such as the earth or an electric circuit connected to the earth, used as an arbitrary zero of potential.
b. A conducting object, such as a wire, that is connected to such a position of zero potential.
13. A mesh background upon which patterns are worked in lace-making.
v. ground·ed, ground·ing, grounds
v.tr.
1. To place on or cause to touch the ground.
2. To provide a basis for (a theory, for example); justify.
3. To supply with basic information; instruct in fundamentals.
4.
a. To prevent (an aircraft or a pilot) from flying.
b. Informal To restrict (someone) especially to a certain place as a punishment.
5. Electricity To connect (an electric circuit) to a ground.
6. Nautical To run (a vessel) aground.
7.
a. Baseball To hit (a ball) onto the ground.
b. Football To throw (a ball) to the ground in order to stop play and avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage.
v.intr.
1. To touch or reach the ground.
2. Baseball To hit a ground ball: grounded to the second baseman.
3. Nautical To run aground.
Phrasal Verb:
ground out Baseball
To be put out by hitting a ground ball that is fielded and thrown to first base.
Idioms:
drive/run into the ground
To belabor (an issue or a subject).
from the ground up
From the most basic level to the highest level; completely: designed the house from the ground up; learned the family business from the ground up.
off the ground
Under way, as if in flight: Because of legal difficulties, the construction project never got off the ground.
on (one's) own ground
In a situation where one has knowledge or competence: a sculptor back on her own ground after experiments with painting.
on the ground
At a place that is exciting, interesting, or important: a reporter who wanted to be on the ground when the story broke.
to ground
1. Into a den or burrow: a fox going to ground.
2. Into hiding.

[Middle English, from Old English grund.]

ground 2

 (ground)
v.
Past tense and past participle of grind.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grounds - your basis for belief or disbeliefgrounds - your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief; "the evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is very compelling"
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
probable cause - (law) evidence sufficient to warrant an arrest or search and seizure; "a magistrate determined that there was probable cause to search the house"
cogent evidence, proof - any factual evidence that helps to establish the truth of something; "if you have any proof for what you say, now is the time to produce it"
disproof, falsification, refutation - any evidence that helps to establish the falsity of something
track, trail, lead - evidence pointing to a possible solution; "the police are following a promising lead"; "the trail led straight to the perpetrator"
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
sign - (medicine) any objective evidence of the presence of a disorder or disease; "there were no signs of asphyxiation"
2.grounds - the enclosed land around a house or other building; "it was a small house with almost no yard"
backyard - the grounds in back of a house
dooryard - a yard outside the front or rear door of a house
front yard - the yard in front of a house; between the house and the street
garden - a yard or lawn adjoining a house
playground - yard consisting of an outdoor area for children's play
side yard - the grounds at either side of a house
field - a piece of land cleared of trees and usually enclosed; "he planted a field of wheat"
3.grounds - a tract of land cleared for some special purposes (recreation or burial etc.)
4.grounds - a justification for something existing or happening; "he had no cause to complain"; "they had good reason to rejoice"
justification - a statement in explanation of some action or belief
5.grounds - dregs consisting of solid particles (especially of coffee) that form a residue; "it is a Middle Eastern custom to read your future in your coffee grounds"
coffee grounds - the dregs remaining after brewing coffee
dregs, settlings - sediment that has settled at the bottom of a liquid
Translations
أسباب جيدهالأرض أو الحديقَه المحيطة بالحِصنثُفْل
důvodyparkpozemkysedlina
god grundgrumshaveanlægpark
zacc
ástæîurkorgurlóî
dôvody

ground2

(graund) noun
1. the solid surface of the Earth. lying on the ground; high ground.
2. a piece of land used for some purpose. a football ground.
verb
1. to base. His argument is grounded on a series of wrong assumptions.
2. to (cause a ship to) hit the seabed or shore and remain stuck.
3. to prevent (an aeroplane, pilot) from flying. All planes have been grounded because of the fog.
ˈgrounding noun
the teaching of the basic facts of a subject. a good grounding in mathematics.
ˈgroundless adjective
without reason. Your fears are groundless.
grounds noun plural
1. the garden or land round a large house etc. the castle grounds.
2. good reasons. Have you any grounds for calling him a liar?
3. the powder which remains in a cup (eg of coffee) which one has drunk. coffee grounds.
ground floor
the rooms of a building which are at street level. My office is on the ground floor; (also adjective) a ground-floor flat.
groundnutpeanutˈgroundwork noun
work done in preparation for beginning a project etc.
break new ground
to deal with a subject for the first time.
cover ground
to deal with a certain amount of work etc. We've covered a lot of ground at this morning's meeting.
get (something) off the ground
to get (a project etc) started.
hold one's ground
to refuse to move back or retreat when attacked. Although many were killed, the soldiers held their ground.
lose ground
to (be forced to) move back or retreat. The general sent in reinforcements when he saw that his troops were losing ground.
References in classic literature ?
On the other side was a stately stone mansion, plainly betokening every sort of comfort and luxury, from the big coach house and well-kept grounds to the conservatory and the glimpses of lovely things one caught between the rich curtains.
His passionate eager protestations of love, heard coming out of the darkness by the cemetery wall, or from the deep shadows of the trees on the hill that ran up to the Fair Grounds from Waterworks Pond, were repeated in the stores.
Besides Tom and his father, the Swift household was made up of Eradicate Sampson, a colored man-of-all-work, who, with his mule Boomerang, did what he could to keep the grounds around the house in order.
On Sunday mornings one could see him out at the fair grounds, speeding around the race-course in his trotting-buggy, wearing yellow gloves and a black-and-white-check travelling cap, his whiskers blowing back in the breeze.
The lovers were just entering the grounds of the pension.
The pale faces have driven the red-skins from their hunting grounds, and now when they fight, a white man leads the way.
Don't you remember, we used to see him before breakfast wandering around the grounds picking flowers?
It is indeed difficult to imagine that there could have been a serious suspicion of murder, or the slightest grounds for implicating any particular individual as the perpetrator.
Much as I liked my companions, this hour was the thing in the day I liked most; and I liked it best of all when, as the light faded--or rather, I should say, the day lingered and the last calls of the last birds sounded, in a flushed sky, from the old trees-- I could take a turn into the grounds and enjoy, almost with a sense of property that amused and flattered me, the beauty and dignity of the place.
The grounds upon which Linnaeus would fain have banished the whales from the waters, he states as follows: On account of their warm bilocular heart, their lungs, their movable eyelids, their hollow ears, penem intrantem feminam mammis lactantem, and finally, ex lege naturae jure meritoque.
By these means, the circumnavigating Pequod would sweep almost all the known Sperm Whale cruising grounds of the world, previous to descending upon the Line in the Pacific; where Ahab, though everywhere else foiled in his pursuit, firmly counted upon giving battle to Moby Dick, in the sea he was most known to frequent; and at a season when he might most reasonably be presumed to be haunting it.
The Bridewell grounds were on the outskirts of the city and the country around them was unsettled and wild-- on one side was the big drainage canal, and on the other a maze of railroad tracks, and so the wind had full sweep.