grove


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Related to grove: dictionary, Bohemian Grove

grove

 (grōv)
n.
1. A small wood or stand of trees lacking dense undergrowth.
2. A group of trees planted and cultivated for the production of fruit or nuts: an orange grove.

[Middle English, from Old English grāf.]

grove

(ɡrəʊv)
n
1. (Forestry) a small wooded area or plantation
2.
a. a road lined with houses and often trees, esp in a suburban area
b. (capital as part of a street name): Ladbroke Grove.
[Old English grāf; related to grǣfa thicket, greave, Norwegian greivla to intertwine]

grove

(groʊv)

n.
1. a small wood or forested area, usu. with no undergrowth.
2. a small orchard or stand of fruit-bearing trees, esp. citrus trees.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English grāf]
groved, adj.
grove′less, adj.

Grove

 a small wood or group of trees for providing shade, forming avenues, etc. See also bosk.
Examples: grove of bayonets, 1889; of ears of wheat, 1667; of fruit trees, 1838; of their own kindred, 1793; of Athenian literature, 1849; of olives, 1667; of majestic palms, 1856; of spears, 1667; of trees.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grove - a small growth of trees without underbrushgrove - a small growth of trees without underbrush
forest, woods, wood - the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
2.grove - garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowthgrove - garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
apple orchard - a grove of apple trees
garden - a plot of ground where plants are cultivated
lemon grove - a grove of lemon trees
orange grove - grove of orange trees
peach orchard - a grove of peach trees

grove

noun wood, woodland, plantation, covert, thicket, copse, brake, coppice, spinney open fields and groves of trees
Translations
lund
lehto
boschetto
луг
lund
гай

grove

[grəʊv] Narboleda f, bosquecillo m
grove of pinespineda f
grove of poplarsalameda f

grove

[ˈgrəʊv] n [trees] → bosquet m olive grove

grove

nHain m, → Wäldchen nt

grove

[grəʊv] nboschetto
References in classic literature ?
The lobster was a scarlet mystery to her, but she hammered and poked till it was unshelled and its meager proportions concealed in a grove of lettuce leaves.
The house in which they lived stood in a little grove of trees be- yond where the main street of Winesburg crossed Wine Creek.
Sometimes I went south to visit our German neighbours and to admire their catalpa grove, or to see the big elm tree that grew up out of a deep crack in the earth and had a hawk's nest in its branches.
Well go thy way: thou shalt not from this grove Till I torment thee for this injury.
I recollect that, when a stripling, my first exploit in squirrel-shooting was in a grove of tall walnut-trees that shades one side of the valley.
Over the hedge on one side we looked into a plowed field, and on the other we looked over a gate at our master's house, which stood by the roadside; at the top of the meadow was a grove of fir trees, and at the bottom a running brook overhung by a steep bank.
The boundaries of the farm, the grove, the wood-lot, passed by her dizzily, as she walked on; and still she went, leaving one familiar object after another, slacking not, pausing not, till reddening daylight found her many a long mile from all traces of any familiar objects upon the open highway.
So, it would seem, few and fewer thoughts visit each growing man from year to year, for the grove in our minds is laid waste--sold to feed unnecessary fires of ambition, or sent to mill--and there is scarcely a twig left for them to perch on.
I assure you, Miss Woodhouse, it is very delightful to me, to be reminded of a place I am so extremely partial to as Maple Grove.
I heard the rain still beating continuously on the staircase window, and the wind howling in the grove behind the hall; I grew by degrees cold as a stone, and then my courage sank.
Across the streets, at wide intervals, one clumsy lamp was slung by a rope and pulley; at night, when the lamplighter had let these down, and lighted, and hoisted them again, a feeble grove of dim wicks swung in a sickly manner overhead, as if they were at sea.
Having obtained from this clerk a direction to the academic grove in question, I set out, the same afternoon, to visit my old schoolfellow.