grove


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Related to grove: dictionary, Bohemian Grove

grove

 (grōv)
n.
1. A small wood or stand of trees lacking dense undergrowth.
2. A group of trees planted and cultivated for the production of fruit or nuts: an orange grove.

[Middle English, from Old English grāf.]

grove

(ɡrəʊv)
n
1. (Forestry) a small wooded area or plantation
2.
a. a road lined with houses and often trees, esp in a suburban area
b. (capital as part of a street name): Ladbroke Grove.
[Old English grāf; related to grǣfa thicket, greave, Norwegian greivla to intertwine]

grove

(groʊv)

n.
1. a small wood or forested area, usu. with no undergrowth.
2. a small orchard or stand of fruit-bearing trees, esp. citrus trees.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English grāf]
groved, adj.
grove′less, adj.

Grove

 a small wood or group of trees for providing shade, forming avenues, etc. See also bosk.
Examples: grove of bayonets, 1889; of ears of wheat, 1667; of fruit trees, 1838; of their own kindred, 1793; of Athenian literature, 1849; of olives, 1667; of majestic palms, 1856; of spears, 1667; of trees.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grove - a small growth of trees without underbrushgrove - a small growth of trees without underbrush
forest, woods, wood - the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
2.grove - garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowthgrove - garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
apple orchard - a grove of apple trees
garden - a plot of ground where plants are cultivated
lemon grove - a grove of lemon trees
orange grove - grove of orange trees
peach orchard - a grove of peach trees

grove

noun wood, woodland, plantation, covert, thicket, copse, brake, coppice, spinney open fields and groves of trees
Translations
lund
lehto
boschetto
луг
lund
гай

grove

[grəʊv] Narboleda f, bosquecillo m
grove of pinespineda f
grove of poplarsalameda f

grove

[ˈgrəʊv] n [trees] → bosquet m olive grove

grove

nHain m, → Wäldchen nt

grove

[grəʊv] nboschetto
References in classic literature ?
that seemed to be drawn from the inmost recesses of his heart, the Knight of the Grove brought his lay to an end, and shortly afterwards exclaimed in a melancholy and piteous voice, "O fairest and most ungrateful woman on earth
But this was not the case, for the Knight of the Grove, hearing voices near him, instead of continuing his lamentation, stood up and exclaimed in a distinct but courteous tone, "Who goes there?
After observing these lively indications for a while, I was attracted to a neighbouring grove by a prodigious squeaking which I heard there.
I assure you, Miss Woodhouse, it is very delightful to me, to be reminded of a place I am so extremely partial to as Maple Grove.
She would have wanted to put on her hat earlier than usual; only she had told Captain Donnithorne that she usually set out about eight o'clock, and if he SHOULD go to the Grove again expecting to see her, and she should be gone
It was now a pleasant evening in the latter end of June, when our heroe was walking in a most delicious grove, where the gentle breezes fanning the leaves, together with the sweet trilling of a murmuring stream, and the melodious notes of nightingales, formed altogether the most enchanting harmony.
I followed them from the court towards the oak grove.
Then the horses for a while rattle the empty car, being rid of guidance; and if they break the chariot in the woody grove, men look after the horses, but tilt the chariot and leave it there; for this was the rite from the very first.
I Know that these gratifying social ends were so invariably accomplished, that Herbert and I understood nothing else to be referred to in the first standing toast of the society: which ran "Gentlemen, may the present promotion of good feeling ever reign predominant among the Finches of the Grove.
Now, from what you tell me, the negro had just come from the direction of Diana's Grove, carrying the dead snakes which the mongoose had killed the previous morning.
If any man has got anything to say again Jem Groves, let him say it TO Jem Groves, and Jem Groves can accommodate him with a customer on any terms from four pound a side to forty.
Again, for miles along the shores, handsome country seats, surrounded by gardens and groves, sit fairly in the water, sometimes in nooks carved by Nature out of the vine-hung precipices, and with no ingress or egress save by boats.