grubby

(redirected from grubbier)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

grub·by

 (grŭb′ē)
adj. grub·bi·er, grub·bi·est
1. Dirty; grimy: grubby old work clothes. See Synonyms at dirty.
2. Infested with grubs.
3. Contemptible; despicable: has a grubby way of treating others.

grub′bi·ly adv.
grub′bi·ness n.

grubby

(ˈɡrʌbɪ)
adj, -bier or -biest
1. dirty; slovenly
2. mean; beggarly
3. (Zoology) infested with grubs
ˈgrubbily adv
ˈgrubbiness n

grub•by

(ˈgrʌb i)

adj. -bi•er, -bi•est.
1. dirty; slovenly.
2. infested with grubs.
3. contemptible; ignoble: grubby tricks.
[1605–15]
grub′bi•ly, adv.
grub′bi•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grubby - small sculpin of the coast of New England
sculpin - any of numerous spiny large-headed usually scaleless scorpaenoid fishes with broad mouths
Adj.1.grubby - infested with grubs
2.grubby - thickly covered with ingrained dirt or sootgrubby - thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot; "a miner's begrimed face"; "dingy linen"; "grimy hands"; "grubby little fingers"; "a grungy kitchen"
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"

grubby

adjective dirty, soiled, filthy, squalid, messy, shabby, seedy, scruffy, sordid, untidy, grimy, unwashed, unkempt, mucky, smutty, grungy (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), slovenly, manky (Scot. dialect), scuzzy (slang), skanky (slang), scungy (Austral. & N.Z.), frowzy, besmeared His white coat was grubby and stained.

grubby

adjective
Covered or stained with or as if with dirt or other impurities:
Translations
قذر، وسِخ
umouněný
snavset
skítugur, subbulegur
išsiterliojęsnevalyvasnevalyvumas
netīrs
zafúľaný
umazan

grubby

[ˈgrʌbɪ] ADJ (grubbier (compar) (grubbiest (superl))) (= dirty) → mugriento, sucio, mugroso (LAm)

grubby

[ˈgrʌbi] adj
(= dirty) [clothes, hands, face] → crasseux/euse
[business, activity] → pas très net(te)

grubby

adj (+er)
(= dirty)dreckig; person, clothes, houseschmuddelig (inf)
(fig: = sordid) business, corruption, politicsschmutzig; aspectzwielichtig

grubby

[ˈgrʌbɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → sudicio/a, sporco/a

grubby

(ˈgrabi) adjective
dirty. a grubby little boy.
ˈgrubbiness noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Pattinson may be famous for playing a vampire in the Twilight series, but he seems a lot more predatory and a lot less healthy in Good Time: you can almost smell the sweat dripping from his gaunt, pasty, pop-eyed hustler as he cheats and robs his way around the grubbier corners of New York.
science park like something genius, lunatic and a A symbol of greed and folly, it looks down forlornly on the grubbier hotels and bars still surviving as long as enough ex-pats patronise them.
But it's a comedy of course with a dark and troubling heart; an undercurrent of institutional anti-Semitism as wide as the Grand Canal, with every uttered, accumulated 'Jew' making the viewer feel a little tenser and sicker and grubbier.
The Telegraph called it memorably seedy; The Guardian, comparing him with Jonathan Pryce who originated the role, said his Engineer was an even grubbier, sleazier figure who is the victim of both his background and pathetic fantasies; and media hailed his diminutive presence with a slithery, sleazy command that brings home the sardonic second-act showstopper, 'The American Dream.
I KNOW you're busy people, so you may have missed the slight kerfuffle that took place in one of the grubbier outposts of TV Land last Thursday.
But a new survey on kitchen hygiene paints a grubbier picture.
t's one of the grubbier tricks of the trade but it can be very effective.
The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said: These welcome face lifts to some of London s grubbier corners are enabling Londoners to help make their city a greener, smarter and even better place to be.
Mary Yellan (Jessica Brown Findlay, looking a lot grubbier than she ever did as Downton's Lady Sybil) arrives at the deserted Cornish inn of the title after her mother dies.
JUST because a vehicle can traverse muddy slopes and icy tracks and pack in a fair complement of either grubby children or even grubbier dads fresh (or not-so-fresh.
Whether our export markets will continue to close their eyes to the grubbier side of dairy production is moot.
At the global level, there is a neoliberal faith in and promotion of markets with the belief in an invisible hand governing the market hiding the grubbier ones directing it (Martin 1993).