guardian

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guard·i·an

 (gär′dē-ən)
n.
1. One that guards, watches over, or protects.
2. Law
a. One who is legally responsible for the care and management of the person or property of an incompetent or minor.
3. A superior in a Franciscan monastery.

[Middle English gardein, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French gardien, from alteration of gardenc, from garder, to guard; see guard.]

guard′i·an·ship′ n.

guardian

(ˈɡɑːdɪən)
n
1. one who looks after, protects, or defends: the guardian of public morals.
2. (Law)
a. law someone legally appointed to manage the affairs of a person incapable of acting for himself, as a minor or person of unsound mind
b. social welfare (in England) a local authority, or person accepted by it, named under the Mental Health Act 1983 as having the powers to require a mentally disordered person to live at a specified place, attend for treatment, and be accessible to a doctor or social worker
3. (Roman Catholic Church) (often capital) (in England) another word for custos
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) protecting or safeguarding
ˈguardianˌship n

guard•i•an

(ˈgɑr di ən)

n.
1. a person who guards, protects, or preserves.
2. a person legally entrusted with the care of another's person or property, as that of a minor or someone legally incapacitated.
adj.
3. guarding; protecting: a guardian deity.
[1375–1425; late Middle English gardein < Anglo-French. See warden]
guard′i•an•less, adj.

guardian

1. 'guardian'

A young person's guardian is someone who is legally appointed to look after their affairs, usually because their parents are dead.

2. 'guard'

You do not use guardian to refer to a railway official who travels on a train and makes sure that it arrives and leaves at the correct time. This official is called the guard or conductor in British English.

In American English, he or she is called the conductor.

If anybody has lost anything, please contact the guard at the back of the train.
The conductor stopped the train, and Union Pacific called 911 to report the fire.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guardian - a person who cares for persons or propertyguardian - a person who cares for persons or property
admonisher, monitor, reminder - someone who gives a warning so that a mistake can be avoided
bodyguard, escort - someone who escorts and protects a prominent person
paladin, champion, fighter, hero - someone who fights for a cause
chaperon, chaperone - one who accompanies and supervises a young woman or gatherings of young people
custodian, keeper, steward - one having charge of buildings or grounds or animals
fire fighter, fire-eater, firefighter, fireman - a member of a fire department who tries to extinguish fires
foster parent, foster-parent - a person who acts as parent and guardian for a child in place of the child's natural parents but without legally adopting the child
guard - a person who keeps watch over something or someone
keeper - someone in charge of other people; "am I my brother's keeper?"
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
patron saint - a saint who is considered to be a defender of some group or nation
peacekeeper - someone who keeps peace; "she's the peacekeeper in that family"
preserver - someone who keeps safe from harm or danger
tribune - (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
watchdog - a guardian or defender against theft or illegal practices or waste; "she is the global watchdog for human rights abuses"

guardian

noun keeper, champion, defender, guard, trustee, warden, curator, protector, warder, custodian, preserver He regards himself as a guardian of traditional values.

guardian

noun
A person who is legally responsible for the person or property of another considered by law to be incompetent to manage his or her affairs:
Translations
حارِسوَصي، وَلي أمْر
dozorceporučníkstrážce
værgevogter
edunvalvojahuoltajasuojelijavahtivartija
gyám
forráîamaîurgæslumaîur
globojimas
aizbildnisapsargātājssargs
poručník
čuvaj

guardian

[ˈgɑːdɪən]
A. N
1.protector(a) m/f, guardián/ana m/f
2. (Jur) [of child] → tutor(a) m/f
B. CPD guardian angel Nángel m custodio, ángel m de la guarda

guardian

[ˈgɑːrdiən] n
[minor] → tuteur/trice m/f
[peace, morality, values] → gardien(ne) m/fguardian angel nange m gardien

guardian

nHüter(in), Wächter(in) m(f); (Jur) → Vormund m; guardian of traditionHüter(in) m(f)der Tradition

guardian

[ˈgɑːdɪən] ncustode m/f; (of minor) → tutore/trice

guardian

(ˈgaːdiən) noun
1. a person who has the legal right to take care of a child (usually an orphan). He became the child's guardian when her parents died.
2. a person who looks after something. the guardian of the castle.
ˈguardianship noun
the state or duty of being a guardian.

guard·i·an

n. guardián-a, custodio-a; tutor-a.

guardian

n (legal) tutor -ra mf
References in classic literature ?
In peace, from their want of confidence in each other, they will entrust the guardianship of the state to mercenaries and their general, who will be an arbiter between them, and sometimes become master of both, which happened at Larissa, when Simos and the Aleuadae had the chief power.
It had no park, but the pleasure-grounds were tolerably extensive; and like every other place of the same degree of importance, it had its open shrubbery, and closer wood walk, a road of smooth gravel winding round a plantation, led to the front, the lawn was dotted over with timber, the house itself was under the guardianship of the fir, the mountain-ash, and the acacia, and a thick screen of them altogether, interspersed with tall Lombardy poplars, shut out the offices.
Joseph mumbled indistinctly in the depths of the cellar, but gave no intimation of ascending; so his master dived down to him, leaving me VIS-A-VIS the ruffianly bitch and a pair of grim shaggy sheep-dogs, who shared with her a jealous guardianship over all my movements.
Who is likely to make suitable provisions for the public defense, as that body to which the guardianship of the public safety is confided; which, as the centre of information, will best understand the extent and urgency of the dangers that threaten; as the representative of the WHOLE, will feel itself most deeply interested in the preservation of every part; which, from the responsibility implied in the duty assigned to it, will be most sensibly impressed with the necessity of proper exertions; and which, by the extension of its authority throughout the States, can alone establish uniformity and concert in the plans and measures by which the common safety is to be secured?
I am joined with him in the guardianship of Miss Darcy.
The marshal of the province in whose hands the law had placed the control of so many important public functions--the guardianship of wards (the very department which was giving Levin so much trouble just now), the disposal of large sums subscribed by the nobility of the province, the high schools, female, male, and military, and popular instruction on the new model, and finally, the district council--the marshal of the province, Snetkov, was a nobleman of the old school,--dissipating an immense fortune, a good-hearted man, honest after his own fashion, but utterly without any comprehension of the needs of modern days.
During the whole term of this recess from the guardianship of the Bank, Mrs.
Perhaps these were reasons for the old gentleman's giving his assent; but, whether they were or no, he told Oliver he might go, and placed him under the joint guardianship of Charley Bates, and his friend the Dodger.
If the child, on the other hand, were really capable of moral and religious growth, and possessed the elements of ultimate salvation, then, surely, it would enjoy all the fairer prospect of these advantages by being transferred to wiser and better guardianship than Hester Prynne's.
The prisoner did not wish to lose time; and she resolved to make that very evening some attempts to ascertain the nature of the ground she had to work upon, by studying the characters of the men to whose guardianship she was committed.
Though the prospect," says he, "of once more tasting the blessings of peaceful society, and passing days and nights under the calm guardianship of the laws, was not without its attractions; yet to those of us whose whole lives had been spent in the stirring excitement and perpetual watchfulness of adventures in the wilderness, the change was far from promising an increase of that contentment and inward satisfaction most conducive to happiness.
It provides that he shall exercise the full authority of Warden, and shall have the disposal of the annual revenue attached to the office, until my return, or, failing that, until Bruno comes of age: and that he shall then hand over, to myself or to Bruno as the case may be, the Wardenship, the unspent revenue, and the contents of the Treasury, which are to be preserved, intact, under his guardianship.