guards


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

guard

 (gärd)
v. guard·ed, guard·ing, guards
v.tr.
1.
a. To watch over (a place or person, for example) in order to keep from being damaged, robbed, or injured: guard a bank; guarding a witness. See Synonyms at defend.
b. To supervise the entry and exit through; keep watch at: guard a door.
c. To watch over so as to prevent escape or violence: guard a prisoner.
d. To keep from risk or curtailment; ensure the safety or integrity of: jealously guarded his success; carefully guarded her privacy.
2. Sports To keep (an opposing player) from scoring or playing effectively, usually by remaining close to the player to disrupt offensive play.
3. To maintain control over, as to prevent indiscretion: Guard what you say.
4. To furnish (a device or object) with a part that protects people from harm or injury.
5. Archaic To escort as a guard.
v.intr.
1. To take precautions: guarded against illness by getting exercise.
2. To serve as a guard.
n.
1. A person who protects, keeps watch, or acts as a sentinel: a prison guard.
2.
a. The act or duty of guarding.
b. Protection; watch: The sheepdog kept guard over the herd.
3. Something that gives protection; a safeguard: a guard against tooth decay.
4. A device or attachment that prevents injury, damage, or loss, especially:
a. An attachment or covering put on a machine to protect the operator or a part of the machine.
b. A device on a foil, sword, or knife that protects the hand.
c. A padded covering worn to protect a body part from injury: a shin guard.
d. A small chain or band attached to a watch or bracelet to prevent loss.
e. A ring worn to prevent a more valuable ring from sliding off the finger.
5. An honor guard.
6. Chiefly British A railway employee in charge of a train.
7. Football One of the two offensive linemen on either side of the center.
8. Basketball Either of the two players normally positioned in the backcourt who are responsible for bringing the ball to and initiating offensive plays from the frontcourt.
9. Sports A defensive position or stance, as in boxing or fencing.
10. Electronics A signal that prevents accidental activation of a device or ambiguous interpretation of data.
Idioms:
off (one's) guard
Not alert; unprepared.
on (one's) guard
Alert and watchful; cautious.
stand guard
1. To keep watch.
2. To act as a sentinel.

[Middle English garden, from Old French garder, guarder, of Germanic origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

guard′er n.

Guards

(ɡɑːdz)
pl n
(Military)
a. (esp in European armies) any of various regiments responsible for ceremonial duties and, formerly, the protection of the head of state: the Life Guards; the Grenadier Guards.
b. (as modifier): a Guards regiment.

guards

Two good dribblers and passers who direct the offense.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
They were our Horse Guards, advancing to attack the French cavalry that was coming to meet them.
From Xodar I learned the duties and customs of the guards who patrolled Shador.
Two guards attended the mercer who made him traverse a court and enter a corridor in which were three sentinels, opened a door and pushed him unceremoniously into a low room, where the only furniture was a table, a chair, and a commissary.
So it was that the tribe was left without eyes or guards.
The mail coach doors were on their hinges, the lining was replaced, the ironwork was as good as new, the paint was restored, the lamps were alight; cushions and greatcoats were on every coach-box, porters were thrusting parcels into every boot, guards were stowing away letter-bags, hostlers were dashing pails of water against the renovated wheels; numbers of men were pushing about, fixing poles into every coach; passengers arrived, portmanteaus were handed up, horses were put to; in short, it was perfectly clear that every mail there, was to be off directly.
Two turnkeys, an inspector, and three or four guards, made their appearance all at once, and found Cornelius still using the stick, with the knife under his foot.
The number of guards and gorgeousness of their trappings quite usually denote the status of the hotel.
One of the guards on horseback answered that they were galley slaves belonging to his majesty, that they were going to the galleys, and that was all that was to be said and all he had any business to know.
Any one who happened at that moment to contemplate that red simar -- the gorgeous robe of office -- and the rich lace, or who gazed on that pale brow, bent in anxious meditation, might, in the solitude of that apartment, combined with the silence of the ante-chambers and the measured paces of the guards upon the landing-place, have fancied that the shade of Cardinal Richelieu lingered still in his accustomed haunt.
de Gesvres appeared, at the head of twelve guards, in front of the hostelry.
A smart guard jumped out, giving a whistle, and after him one by one the impatient passengers began to get down: an officer of the guards, holding himself erect, and looking severely about him; a nimble little merchant with a satchel, smiling gaily; a peasant with a sack over his shoulder.
Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty.