gueuze


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gueuze

 (go͞oz, gœz)
n.
A beer of Belgian origin consisting of aged and unaged lambics which are blended and allowed to undergo a second fermentation.

[French regional (Brussels) gueuze and Flemish regional (Brussels) geuze, perhaps after French rue de Gueuze, and Flemish Geuzenstraat, a street in Brussels (where a brewery may have begun producing gueuze in the middle of the 19th century as a way to reuse old champagne bottles), after Flemish Geuzen, Calvinist nobles who opposed Spanish rule in the Low Countries in the 16th century, from Middle French gueux, plural of gueux, beggar, from Middle Dutch guit, rascal, from guiten, to belittle, joke, beg; perhaps akin to German dialectal gauzen, to bark, shout.]
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One is Timmerman's Oude Gueuze, a Iambicstyle beer from Belgium aged three years in wooden barrels and offered on the menu for $25 for a 750-ml.
HANSSENS ARTISANAAL OUDE GUEUZE LAMBIC Entirely without fruit, this sour creates a refreshingly tart match.
Where else in town can you watch the football in HD whilst drinking a Belgian Gueuze from Boon Brewery?
Lager and other beers (amber, cherry, Gueuze, wheat beer, strong beer, .
At Brussels Museum of Gueuze you can get a tour of the brewery followed by a complimentary drink to enjoy in an atmospheric room full of oak barrels ([euro]6) www.
In a storeroom stocked with one year's worth of aging specialty sour beers called lambics and gueuze, the temperature spiked to sauna-like levels for 36 hours.
It is known for its Grand Place, Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Musee Bruxellois de la Gueuze, Manneken Pis, pageants/parades, waffle and chocolate.
If you really want to get close to the type of beer drunk in 1366, a naturally fermented Gueuze is probably the answer.
Lambic beers, such as Boon Gueuze Lambic or Lindemans Framboise Lambic, are unique in that the fermentation process is spontaneously initiated from wild strains of yeast from the Senne Valley in Belgium.
The brew, Gueuze, is regarded as the champagne of beers and takes up to three years to mature with a fermentation process - known as Lambic - that has been unchanged for almost four centuries.
Other protected products included the Finnish traditional beer Sahti, the Belgian fruit beers Kriek, Gueuze and Faro, the Mozzarella cheese and the Traditional Farmfresh Turkey.