guile


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Related to guile: without guile

guile

 (gīl)
n.
1. Treacherous cunning; skillful deceit.
2. A trick or stratagem.
tr.v. guiled, guil·ing, guiles Archaic
To beguile; deceive.

[Middle English, from Old French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English wigle, divination, sorcery.]

guile

(ɡaɪl)
n
clever or crafty character or behaviour
[C18: from Old French guile, of Germanic origin; see wile]
ˈguileful adj
ˈguilefully adv
ˈguilefulness n

guile

(gaɪl)

n.
insidious cunning in attaining a goal; crafty deception.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Germanic; akin to wile]
syn: See deceit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guile - shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deceptionguile - shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception
astuteness, perspicaciousness, perspicacity, shrewdness - intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)
2.guile - the quality of being crafty
disingenuousness - the quality of being disingenuous and lacking candor
3.guile - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)guile - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
dissimulation, deception, dissembling, deceit - the act of deceiving
dupery, hoax, put-on, humbug, fraud, fraudulence - something intended to deceive; deliberate trickery intended to gain an advantage
jugglery - artful trickery designed to achieve an end; "the senator's tax program was mere jugglery"

guile

guile

noun
2. The act or practice of deceiving:
Translations
مُكْر، إحْتيال النساء
lest
listsnuhed
vélabrögî, kænska
atviraširdisatviraširdiškaiatviraširdiškumasklasta
viltībaviltus
hilekârlık

guile

[gaɪl] Nastucia f

guile

[ˈgaɪl] nruse f, astuce f

guile

nTücke f, → (Arg)list f; to have guilesehr tückisch or arglistig sein; without guileohne Arg, ohne Falsch (liter)

guile

[gaɪl] nastuzia

guile

(gail) noun
the ability to deceive or trick people. She used guile to get him to propose to her.
ˈguileless adjective
honest; sincere. a guileless person/smile.
ˈguilelessly adverb
ˈguilelessness noun
References in classic literature ?
She knew that he loved her--a frank, blustering fellow without guile enough to conceal his feelings, and no desire to do so.
Notwithstanding the symptoms of habitual suspicion, his countenance was not only without guile, but at the moment at which he is introduced, it was charged with an expression of sturdy honesty.
While Tom was eating his supper, and stealing sugar as opportunity offered, Aunt Polly asked him questions that were full of guile, and very deep -- for she wanted to trap him into damaging revealments.
Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd The Mother of Mankinde, what time his Pride Had cast him out from Heav'n, with all his Host Of Rebel Angels, by whose aid aspiring To set himself in Glory above his Peers, He trusted to have equal'd the most High, If he oppos'd; and with ambitious aim Against the Throne and Monarchy of God Rais'd impious War in Heav'n and Battel proud With vain attempt.
The worthy Sancho Panza here you see; A great soul once was in that body small, Nor was there squire upon this earthly ball So plain and simple, or of guile so free.
The ape-man could scarce help smiling as he thought how cleverly he had tricked his friend; but well as he knew Tantor he little guessed the guile of his cunning brain.
We were among the first he counted, and he never suspected any guile, but laid himself down to sleep as soon as he had done counting.
What we have divided we have divided," he seems to say in his gruff voice, this ruler without guile, who hurls as if in sport enormous masses of cloud across the sky, and flings the great waves of the Atlantic clear across from the shores of the New World upon the hoary headlands of Old Europe, which harbours more kings and rulers upon its seamed and furrowed body than all the oceans of the world together.
There was no mastery to be obtained over him except by kindness or guile.
When he saw this Agamemnon rebuked them and said, "Son of Peteos, and you other, steeped in cunning, heart of guile, why stand you here cowering and waiting on others?
We were all disposed to wonder, but it seems to have been the merciful appointment of Providence that the heart which knew no guile should not suffer.
Untrained human nature was not frank and innocent; it was full of the twists and defences of an instinctive guile.