guilt

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guilt

 (gĭlt)
n.
1.
a. The fact of being responsible for the commission of an offense; moral culpability: The investigation uncovered the suspect's guilt. See Synonyms at blame.
b. Law The fact of having been found to have violated a criminal law; legal culpability: The jury's job is to determine the defendant's guilt or innocence.
c. Responsibility for a mistake or error: The guilt for the book's many typos lies with the editor.
2. A painful emotion experienced when one believes one's actions or thoughts have violated a moral or personal standard: She felt guilt for not having helped the injured animal.
tr.v. guilt·ed, guilt·ing, guilts
1. To make or try to make (someone) feel guilty: My roommate guilted me for forgetting to wash the dishes.
2. To cause (someone) to do something by arousing feelings of guilt: My roommate guilted me into washing the dishes.

[Middle English gilt, from Old English gylt, crime.]

guilt

(ɡɪlt)
n
1. the fact or state of having done wrong or committed an offence
2. (Law) responsibility for a criminal or moral offence deserving punishment or a penalty
3. remorse or self-reproach caused by feeling that one is responsible for a wrong or offence
4. archaic sin or crime
[Old English gylt, of obscure origin]

guilt

(gɪlt)

n.
1. the fact or state of having committed an offense, crime, violation, or wrong, esp. against moral or penal law; culpability: to admit one's guilt in a robbery.
2. a feeling of responsibility or remorse for some offense, crime, wrong, etc., whether real or imagined.
3. conduct involving the commission of such crimes, wrongs, etc.: to live a life of guilt.
[before 1000; Middle English gilt, Old English gylt offense]

Guilt

 

See Also: CONSCIENCE

  1. Branded with his guilt as if he were tattooed —Henry Slesar
  2. Berating himself, like an orator grading his own speech —William Diehl
  3. Gather guilt like a young intern his symptoms, his certain evidence —Anne Sexton
  4. Guilt is like mothers. Everyone in the world has at least one. And it’s passed down like a torch to the next generation —Erma Bombeck This has been changed to the present tense from the original, which read: “I figured out long ago that guilt was like mothers. Everyone in the world had at least one. And it was passed down like a torch to the next generation.”
  5. Guilt, thick as ether, seeped into my body —Jonathan Valin
  6. Guilt will descend on you like London fog —Walter Allen
  7. The heat of shame mounted through her legs and body and sounded in her ears like the sound of sand pouring —Nadine Gordimer
  8. Looked as guilty as if he’d kicked his grandmother —Raymond Chandler
  9. Looking behind me … as guilty as a murderer whose knife drips blood —Ann Beattie
  10. Looks like a hound caught slipping a chop from the table —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  11. A sense of guilt like a scent —Louis MacNeice
  12. Shame crowding his throat like vomit —Jean Thompson
  13. The thought of the wrong she had done … aroused in her a feeling akin to revulsion such as a drowning man might feel who had shaken off another man who clung to him in the water —Leo Tolstoy
  14. We are all like mice: one eats the cheese and all are blamed —Solomon Ibn Vega

Guilt

 

caught with one’s hand in the cookie jar Taken by surprise in the process of wrongdoing; caught red-handed. This expression implies that the person caught is not only surprised, but is also in possession of self-incriminating material. Though the image is that of a mischievous child atop a counter engaged in normal childhood activities, in context the phrase is often used for serious adult wrongdoing, particularly political graft.

caught with one’s pants down See VULNERABILITY.

cry peccavi To confess one’s guilt; to openly acknowledge one’s fault or wrongdoing. The origin of this expression is the Latin peccavi I have sinned.’ Both peccavi ‘an acknowledgement of guilt’ and cry peccavi date from the 16th century.

Now lowly crouch’d, I cry peccavi, And prostrate, supplicate pour ma vie.
(Jonathan Swift, Sheridan’s Submission, 1730)

dead to rights See CERTAINTY.

red-handed In the act, with clear evidence of guilt, in flagrante delicto. This term evolved from the earlier with red hand and with bloody hand.

tarred with the same brush See SIMILARITY.

with bloody hand Guilty; caught red-handed or in flagrante delicto. According to the Forest Law of ancient Britain, a man found with bloody hand was presumed guilty of having killed the king’s deer.

with egg on one’s face See HUMILIATION.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guilt - the state of having committed an offenseguilt - the state of having committed an offense
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
bloodguilt - the state of being guilty of bloodshed and murder
complicity - guilt as an accomplice in a crime or offense
criminalism, criminality, criminalness - the state of being a criminal
guilt by association - the attribution of guilt (without proof) to individuals because the people they associate with are guilty
impeachability, indictability - the state of being liable to impeachment
innocence - a state or condition of being innocent of a specific crime or offense; "the trial established his innocence"
2.guilt - remorse caused by feeling responsible for some offense
compunction, remorse, self-reproach - a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)
survivor guilt - a deep feeling of guilt often experienced by those who have survived some catastrophe that took the lives of many others; derives in part from a feeling that they did not do enough to save the others who perished and in part from feelings of being unworthy relative to those who died; "survivor guilt was first noted in those who survived the Holocaust"

guilt

noun
1. shame, regret, remorse, contrition, guilty conscience, bad conscience, self-reproach, self-condemnation, guiltiness Her emotions went from anger to guilt in the space of a few seconds.
shame honour, pride, self-respect
2. culpability, blame, responsibility, misconduct, delinquency, criminality, wickedness, iniquity, sinfulness, blameworthiness, guiltiness You were never convinced of his guilt, were you?
culpability virtue, innocence, righteousness, sinlessness, blamelessness
Quotations
"This is his first punishment, that by the verdict of his own heart no guilty man is acquitted" [Juvenal Satires]
"So full of artless jealousy is guilt"
"It spills itself in fearing to be spilt" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]

guilt

noun
Responsibility for an error or crime:
Translations
إحساس بالذَّنْبجُرْم، ذَنْبشُعور الذَنْب
вина
vina
skyldskyldfølelse
syyllisyys
krivnja
bűnbûntudat
kesalahan
sekt
有罪
유죄
culpa
kalta¤
vaina
păcat
vina
krivda
грех
skuldskuldkänsla
ความผิด
tội

guilt

[gɪlt]
A. N (gen) → culpa f, culpabilidad f (Jur) → culpabilidad f
feelings of guiltsentimientos mpl de culpa or de culpabilidad
to admit one's guiltconfesarse culpable
she was racked with guiltla atormentaba el remordimiento
B. CPD guilt complex Ncomplejo m de culpabilidad or de culpa
guilt trip N there's no point in having a guilt trip about itno merece la pena empezar con sentimientos de culpabilidad, no merece la pena sentirse culpable

guilt

[ˈgɪlt] nculpabilité fguilt complex ncomplexe m de culpabilité

guilt

nSchuld f (→ for, of an +dat); to feel guilt (about something)sich (wegen etw) schuldig fühlen, (wegen etw) Schuldgefühle haben; feelings of guiltSchuldgefühle pl; guilt complexSchuldkomplex m

guilt

[gɪlt] n (being guilty) → colpevolezza; (feeling guilty) → colpa, senso di colpa
tormented by guilt → tormentato/a dal senso di colpa

guilt

(gilt) noun
1. a sense of shame. a feeling of guilt.
2. the state of having done wrong. Fingerprints proved the murderer's guilt.
ˈguilty adjective
having, feeling, or causing guilt. The jury found the prisoner guilty; a guilty conscience.
ˈguiltiness noun
ˈguiltily adverb
He looked at his mother guiltily.

guilt

شُعور الذَنْب vina skyld Schuld ενοχή culpa syyllisyys culpabilité krivnja colpa 有罪 유죄 schuldgevoel skyld wina culpa вина skuld ความผิด suçluluk tội 犯罪

guilt

n culpa; feelings of — sentimientos de culpa
References in periodicals archive ?
His analysis of attempts to impose household chores on children is a resonant rendering of the emotional conflicts--generational tensions, spousal resentments, maternal guilts, and more--that conditioned the pathetic failure of such efforts.
With compassion as well as a wry, withering wit, he follows the intriguing twists and turns by which a movement driven by parents' guilt and pediatricians' good intentions led not only to research funding and national legislation but also to journalistic hyperbole and genetic findings that only compounded the parental guilt and anxieties the movement meant to relieve.
I'm more interested in the accumulated guilts that come to African American men simply because they were born black in America.