gulf


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Related to gulf: Gulf War

gulf

 (gŭlf)
n.
1. Abbr. G. A large area of a sea or ocean partially enclosed by land, especially a long landlocked portion of sea opening through a strait.
2. A deep, wide chasm; an abyss.
3. A wide gap, as in understanding: "the gulf between the Victorian sensibility and our own" (Babette Deutsch).
4. Something, such as a whirlpool, that draws down or engulfs.
tr.v. gulfed, gulf·ing, gulfs
To engulf.

[Middle English goulf, from Old French golfe, from Old Italian golfo, from Late Latin colpus, colfus, from Greek kolpos, bosom, gulf.]

gulf

(ɡʌlf)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a large deep bay
2. (Physical Geography) a deep chasm
3. something that divides or separates, such as a lack of understanding
4. something that engulfs, such as a whirlpool
vb
(tr) to swallow up; engulf
[C14: from Old French golfe, from Italian golfo, from Greek kolpos]
ˈgulfˌlike adj
ˈgulfy adj

Gulf

(ɡʌlf)
n
1. (Placename) the Persian Gulf
2. (Placename)
a. the Gulf of Carpentaria
b. (modifier) of, relating to, or adjoining the Gulf: Gulf country.
3. (Placename) NZ the Hauraki Gulf

gulf

(gʌlf)

n.
1. a portion of an ocean or sea partly enclosed by land.
2. a deep hollow; abyss.
3. any wide divergence, as between individuals in social status, opinion, etc., or between theory and practice.
4. something that engulfs or swallows up.
v.t.
5. to swallow up; engulf.
[1300–50; < Old French golfe < Italian golfo < Late Greek kólphos, Greek kólpos bosom, lap, bay]

gulf

(gŭlf)
A large body of ocean or sea water that is partly surrounded by land.

gulf


Past participle: gulfed
Gerund: gulfing

Imperative
gulf
gulf
Present
I gulf
you gulf
he/she/it gulfs
we gulf
you gulf
they gulf
Preterite
I gulfed
you gulfed
he/she/it gulfed
we gulfed
you gulfed
they gulfed
Present Continuous
I am gulfing
you are gulfing
he/she/it is gulfing
we are gulfing
you are gulfing
they are gulfing
Present Perfect
I have gulfed
you have gulfed
he/she/it has gulfed
we have gulfed
you have gulfed
they have gulfed
Past Continuous
I was gulfing
you were gulfing
he/she/it was gulfing
we were gulfing
you were gulfing
they were gulfing
Past Perfect
I had gulfed
you had gulfed
he/she/it had gulfed
we had gulfed
you had gulfed
they had gulfed
Future
I will gulf
you will gulf
he/she/it will gulf
we will gulf
you will gulf
they will gulf
Future Perfect
I will have gulfed
you will have gulfed
he/she/it will have gulfed
we will have gulfed
you will have gulfed
they will have gulfed
Future Continuous
I will be gulfing
you will be gulfing
he/she/it will be gulfing
we will be gulfing
you will be gulfing
they will be gulfing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gulfing
you have been gulfing
he/she/it has been gulfing
we have been gulfing
you have been gulfing
they have been gulfing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gulfing
you will have been gulfing
he/she/it will have been gulfing
we will have been gulfing
you will have been gulfing
they will have been gulfing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gulfing
you had been gulfing
he/she/it had been gulfing
we had been gulfing
you had been gulfing
they had been gulfing
Conditional
I would gulf
you would gulf
he/she/it would gulf
we would gulf
you would gulf
they would gulf
Past Conditional
I would have gulfed
you would have gulfed
he/she/it would have gulfed
we would have gulfed
you would have gulfed
they would have gulfed

gulf

A very big and deep coastal inlet, larger than a bay.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gulf - an arm of a sea or ocean partly enclosed by landgulf - an arm of a sea or ocean partly enclosed by land; larger than a bay
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
sea - a division of an ocean or a large body of salt water partially enclosed by land
2.gulf - an unbridgeable disparity (as from a failure of understanding); "he felt a gulf between himself and his former friends"; "there is a vast disconnect between public opinion and federal policy"
disparity - inequality or difference in some respect
3.gulf - a deep wide chasm
chasm - a deep opening in the earth's surface

gulf

noun
1. bay, bight, sea inlet Hurricane Andrew was last night heading into the Gulf of Mexico.
2. chasm, opening, split, gap, rent, breach, separation, void, rift, abyss, cleft the gulf between rural and urban life

gulf

noun
Something of immeasurable and vast extent:
abysm, abyss, chasm, deep, depth (often used in plural).
Translations
خَليج
záliv
golfhavbugt
flói
įlanka
jūras līcis
zaliv
golf

gulf

[gʌlf]
A. N (= bay) → golfo m; (= chasm) (also fig) → abismo m
the (Persian) Gulfel Golfo (Pérsico)
the Gulf of Mexicoel Golfo de Méjico or (LAm) México
the Gulf of Suezel Golfo de Suez
B. CPD the Gulf States NPLlos países del Golfo
the Gulf Stream Nla corriente del Golfo

Gulf

[ˈgʌlf] n
the Gulf → le Golfe (Persique) Gulf Crisis

gulf

[ˈgʌlf] n
(GEOGRAPHY)golfe m
(= divide) → fossé m
a growing gulf between rich and poor → un fossé de plus en plus important entre les riches et les pauvresGulf Crisis Gulf crisis n
the Gulf Crisis → la crise du GolfeGulf of Mexico n
the Gulf of Mexico → le golfe du MexiqueGulf States npl
the Gulf States (in Middle East)les pays mpl du Golfe; (in US)les États mpl du golfe du Mexique

gulf

n
(= bay)Golf m, → Meerbusen m; the Gulf of Mexicoder Golf von Mexiko; the Gulf of Bothniader Bottnische Meerbusen; the (Persian) Gulfder (Persische) Golf
(lit, fig: = chasm) → tiefe Kluft

Gulf

:
Gulf States
pl the Gulfdie Golfstaaten pl
Gulf Stream
nGolfstrom m
Gulf War
nGolfkrieg m

gulf

[gʌlf] n (bay) → golfo; (chasm, also) (fig) → abisso
the (Persian) Gulf → il Golfo Persico

gulf

(galf) noun
a part of the sea with land round a large part of it. the Gulf of Mexico.
References in classic literature ?
The gulf looked far away, melting hazily into the blue of the horizon.
Why, the degenerate fellow might as well have been a fiddler" Such are the compliments bandied between my great grandsires and myself, across the gulf of time And yet, let them scorn me as they will, strong traits of their nature have intertwined themselves with mine
Because, an interval of three hundred and sixty-five days and nights was before him; an interval which, instead of impatiently enduring ashore, he would spend in a miscellaneous hunt; if by chance the White Whale, spending his vacation in seas far remote from his periodical feeding-grounds, should turn up his wrinkled brow off the Persian Gulf, or in the Bengal Bay, or China Seas, or in any other waters haunted by his race.
But not to speak of the passage through the whole length of the Mediterranean, and another passage up the Persian Gulf and Red Sea, such a supposition would involve the complete circumnavigation of all Africa in three days, not to speak of the Tigris waters, near the site of Nineveh, being too shallow for any whale to swim in.
But they were far-off and shadowy, and the gulf between them was black and bottomless; they would fade away into the mists of the past once more.
In such a case, you write to your wife, and send messages to your children; but Tom could not write,--the mail for him had no existence, and the gulf of separation was unbridged by even a friendly word or signal.
Into the world of the ideal Emma Jane, Huldah, and Dick alike never seemed to have peeped, and the consciousness of this was always a fixed gulf between them and Rebecca.
Noel Vanstone mentally looked into the great gulf which separates the faculty that can discover a defect, from the faculty that can apply a remedy, and, following the example of many a wiser man, declined to cross over it.
Good-humoured looking on the whole, but implacable-looking, too; evidently a man of a strong resolution and a set purpose; a man not desirable to be met, rushing down a narrow pass with a gulf on either side, for nothing would turn the man.
I kissed her, and my baby brother, and was very sorry then; but not sorry to go away, for the gulf between us was there, and the parting was there, every day.
That I had a fever and was avoided, that I suffered greatly, that I often lost my reason, that the time seemed interminable, that I confounded impossible existences with my own identity; that I was a brick in the house wall, and yet entreating to be released from the giddy place where the builders had set me; that I was a steel beam of a vast engine, clashing and whirling over a gulf, and yet that I implored in my own person to have the engine stopped, and my part in it hammered off; that I passed through these phases of disease, I know of my own remembrance, and did in some sort know at the time.
I say brave, for I am always struck by the courage of the two who thus gaily leap into the gulf of the unknown together, thus join hands over the inevitable, and put their signatures to the irrevocable.