gullible


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gul·li·ble

 (gŭl′ə-bəl)
adj.
Easily deceived or duped.

[From gull.]

gul′li·bil′i·ty n.
gul′li·bly adv.

gullible

(ˈɡʌləbəl)
adj
easily taken in or tricked
ˌgulliˈbility n
ˈgullibly adv

gul•li•ble

(ˈgʌl ə bəl)

adj.
easily deceived or cheated; naive; credulous.
Sometimes, gul′la•ble.
[1815–25; gull2 + -ible]
gul`li•bil′i•ty, n.
gul′li•bly, adv.

gullible

- A derivative of archaic gull, "dupe" or "simpleton."
See also related terms for simpleton.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gullible - naive and easily deceived or tricked; "at that early age she had been gullible and in love"
naif, naive - marked by or showing unaffected simplicity and lack of guile or worldly experience; "a teenager's naive ignorance of life"; "the naive assumption that things can only get better"; "this naive simple creature with wide friendly eyes so eager to believe appearances"
2.gullible - easily tricked because of being too trusting; "gullible tourists taken in by the shell game"
unwary - not alert to danger or deception; "the shrieks of unwary animals taken by surprise"; "some thieves prey especially on unwary travelers"; "seduce the unwary reader into easy acquiescence"- O.J.Campbell

gullible

adjective trusting, innocent, naive, unsuspecting, green, simple, silly, foolish, unsophisticated, credulous, born yesterday, wet behind the ears (informal), easily taken in, unsceptical, as green as grass I'm so gullible I believed him.
worldly, sophisticated, suspicious, cynical, untrusting

gullible

adjective
Easily imposed on or tricked:
Translations
سَهْل الإنْخِداع، ساذِج
důvěřivýnaivní
godtroende
trúgjarn
patiklumas
lētticīgs
ľahkoverný
aptalkolay aldanır

gullible

[ˈgʌlɪbl] ADJcrédulo, simplón

gullible

[ˈgʌləbəl] adjcrédule

gullible

adj, gullibly

gullible

[ˈgʌlɪbl] adjcredulone/a, sempliciotto/a

gullible

(ˈgaləbl) adjective
easily tricked or fooled. He is so gullible that he believes everything you tell him.
ˌgulliˈbility noun
References in classic literature ?
There might be treachery lurking beneath their fair appearance; but none who knew The Hawk would be so gullible as to hope to trap him thus.
He was rid of Jacob--he was bound for the Indies, where a gullible princess awaited him.
the causes which appeal to the gullible many without imposing upon the cantankerous few.
But still John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, stood deaf and unseeing, suffering the pangs of keen regret for the opportunity that he had wasted because he had been so gullible as to place credence in a single statement of the first lieutenant of his arch-enemy.
Thinking to attract attention from inside the craft, I again ran down the ladder and onto the small deck only to find that the steel covers of the conning-tower windows were shut, and then I leaned with my back against the tower and cursed myself for a gullible idiot.
I don't know if it was from utter lack of all imagination or from the possession in undue proportion of a particular kind of it, or from both--and the three alternatives are possible--but it was discovered that this man who had been raised to such a height by the credulity of the public was himself more gullible than any of his depositors.
So far the crime seemed clear enough; and while the detective pitied the priest for his helplessness, he almost despised Flambeau for condescending to so gullible a victim.
Even the gullible who hadn't bothered to read that must have thought the opening question coupled with Wilkinson's reply were a little strange to say the least.
A recent Ontario court decision held, in effect, that anyone who relies on a politician's promise is a gullible idiot.
Given the irreconcilability of Bush's puritanical sex education program with his pro-gay claims, and his mysterious avoidance of attempting to legislate the civil unions he supposedly supports, it seems clear that whatever pro-gay positions he has taken were callous bids to win over gullible gay voters.
BETWEEN THE LINES: The public, particularly the young, is not that gullible.
UK prankster Dom Joly takes his bizarre humour stateside to see if the Americans are equally as gullible over japes in the streets.