gumption


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gump·tion

 (gŭmp′shən)
n. Informal
1. Boldness of enterprise; initiative or aggressiveness.
2. Guts; spunk.
3. Common sense.

[Scots.]

gumption

(ˈɡʌmpʃən)
n
1. Brit common sense or resourcefulness
2. initiative or courage: you haven't the gumption to try.
[C18: originally Scottish, of unknown origin]

gump•tion

(ˈgʌmp ʃən)

n.
1. initiative; resourcefulness.
2. courage; spunk; guts.
3. common sense; shrewdness.
[1710–20; orig. Scots; pseudo-Latinism perhaps based on gaum (see gormless)]
gump′tion•less, adj.
gump′tious, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gumption - sound practical judgment; "Common sense is not so common"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away"
sagaciousness, sagacity, discernment, judgement, judgment - the mental ability to understand and discriminate between relations
logic - reasoned and reasonable judgment; "it made a certain kind of logic"
nous - common sense; "she has great social nous"
road sense - good judgment in avoiding trouble or accidents on the road
2.gumption - fortitude and determinationgumption - fortitude and determination; "he didn't have the guts to try it"
fortitude - strength of mind that enables one to endure adversity with courage
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech

gumption

noun common sense, sense, ability, spirit, initiative, enterprise, wit(s), savvy (slang), acumen, nous (Brit. slang), get-up-and-go (informal), cleverness, resourcefulness, shrewdness, discernment, sagacity, horse sense, astuteness, mother wit He didn't have the gumption to seize the opportunity when it came up.

gumption

noun
1. Informal. An aggressive readiness along with energy to undertake taxing efforts:
Informal: get-up-and-go, push.
2. Informal. The ability to make sensible decisions:
Informal: horse sense.
Translations

gumption

[ˈgʌmpʃən] N (= initiative) → iniciativa f (Brit) (= common sense) → seso m, sentido m común

gumption

[ˈgʌmpʃən] nbon sens m
to have the gumption to do sth → avoir la présence d'esprit de faire qchgum shield nprotège-dents m

gumption

n (inf)Grips m (inf); to have the gumption to do somethinggeistesgegenwärtig genug sein, etw zu tun

gumption

[ˈgʌmpʃn] n (fam) (initiative) → spirito d'iniziativa; (common sense) → buon senso, senso pratico
References in classic literature ?
Professor Beecher has more gumption than I gave him credit for," he said.
Does I shin aroun' mongs' de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill DO b'long to, en han' it over to de right one, all safe en soun', de way dat anybody dat had any gumption would?
I don't mean it that way, senora," said Sancho; "and if you think the letter doesn't run as it ought to do, it's only to tear it up and make another; and maybe it will be a worse one if it is left to my gumption.
All at once - was it the tongue of Nature telling me the way, or common gumption returning at the eleventh hour?
If Freddy had a bit of gumption, he would have got one at the theatre door.
They said that I was an extremely neat thrower, and that I seemed to have plenty of gumption for the thing, and quite enough constitutional laziness.
Judging from what you all, say" remarked Aunt Jamesina, "the sum and substance is that you can learn -- if you've got natural gumption enough -- in four years at college what it would take about twenty years of living to teach you.
But what about people who haven't natural gumption, Aunt Jimsie?
People who haven't natural gumption never learn," retorted Aunt Jamesina, "neither in college nor life.
I wish I had a glass of beer; but I can't get up the gumption to go down to the village an' get it.
The big, white light-house on the red sandstone cliff had its good points; but no stork possessed of any gumption would leave a new, velvet baby there.
Did you really have the gumption to suspect me just because I brought you up to this bare part of the heath?