gust

(redirected from gusts)
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gust 1

 (gŭst)
n.
1. A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
2. A sudden burst, as of rain or smoke.
3. An outburst of emotion.
intr.v. gust·ed, gust·ing, gusts
To blow in gusts.

[Probably from Old Norse gustr; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

gust 2

 (gŭst)
n.
1. Archaic Relish; gusto.
2. Obsolete
a. The sense of taste.
b. Personal taste or inclination; liking.

[Middle English guste, taste, from Latin gustus; see gusto.]

gust

(ɡʌst)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a sudden blast of wind
2. a sudden rush of smoke, sound, etc
3. an outburst of emotion
vb (intr)
(Physical Geography) to blow in gusts: the wind was gusting to more than 50 mph.
[C16: from Old Norse gustr; related to gjōsa to gush; see geyser]

gust1

(gʌst)

n., v. gust•ed, gust•ing. n.
1. a sudden strong blast of wind.
2. a sudden rush or burst, as of water or fire.
3. an outburst of passionate feeling.
v.i.
4. to blow or rush in gusts.
[1580–90; < Old Norse gustr a gust, akin to gjōsa, gusa to gust]
syn: See wind1.

gust2

(gʌst)

n.
1. Archaic. flavor or taste.
2. Obs. enjoyment or gratification.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin gustus a tasting (of food), eating a little, akin to gustāre to taste]
gust′a•ble, adj., n.

Gust

 sudden outburst. See also rack.
Examples: gust of fire, 1674; of grace, 1807; of grief, 1715; of hope, 1705; of joy, 1789; of passion, 1783; of pleasure, 1704; of sin, 1639; of smoke, 1811; of sound, 1849; of tears, 1870; of unholy passion, 1852; of temptation, 1681; of water, 1610; of weather, 1697; of wind, 1694.

gust


Past participle: gusted
Gerund: gusting

Imperative
gust
gust
Present
I gust
you gust
he/she/it gusts
we gust
you gust
they gust
Preterite
I gusted
you gusted
he/she/it gusted
we gusted
you gusted
they gusted
Present Continuous
I am gusting
you are gusting
he/she/it is gusting
we are gusting
you are gusting
they are gusting
Present Perfect
I have gusted
you have gusted
he/she/it has gusted
we have gusted
you have gusted
they have gusted
Past Continuous
I was gusting
you were gusting
he/she/it was gusting
we were gusting
you were gusting
they were gusting
Past Perfect
I had gusted
you had gusted
he/she/it had gusted
we had gusted
you had gusted
they had gusted
Future
I will gust
you will gust
he/she/it will gust
we will gust
you will gust
they will gust
Future Perfect
I will have gusted
you will have gusted
he/she/it will have gusted
we will have gusted
you will have gusted
they will have gusted
Future Continuous
I will be gusting
you will be gusting
he/she/it will be gusting
we will be gusting
you will be gusting
they will be gusting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gusting
you have been gusting
he/she/it has been gusting
we have been gusting
you have been gusting
they have been gusting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gusting
you will have been gusting
he/she/it will have been gusting
we will have been gusting
you will have been gusting
they will have been gusting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gusting
you had been gusting
he/she/it had been gusting
we had been gusting
you had been gusting
they had been gusting
Conditional
I would gust
you would gust
he/she/it would gust
we would gust
you would gust
they would gust
Past Conditional
I would have gusted
you would have gusted
he/she/it would have gusted
we would have gusted
you would have gusted
they would have gusted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gust - a strong current of airgust - a strong current of air; "the tree was bent almost double by the gust"
bluster - a violent gusty wind
sandblast - a blast of wind laden with sand
puff, puff of air, whiff - a short light gust of air
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"

gust

noun
1. blast, blow, rush, breeze, puff, gale, flurry, squall A gust of wind drove down the valley.
2. surge, fit, storm, burst, explosion, gale, outburst, eruption, paroxysm A gust of laughter greeted him as he walked into the room.
verb
1. blow, blast, puff, squall strong winds gusting up to 164 miles an hour

gust

noun
1. A natural movement or current of air:
Archaic: gale.
2. A sudden violent expression, as of emotion:
Translations
عَصْفَه، هَبَّه، نَفْحَههَبَّة
poryvprudký závan
vindstød
puuskaryöppy
nalet
gustur, vindhviîa
突風
돌풍
audringaigūsingassu gūsiaisšuorasvėjuotumas
brāzma
náraz
sunek
vindil
ลมแรงพัดกะทันหัน
ani rüzgaranî ve şiddetli esiş
cơn gió mạnh đột ngột

gust

[gʌst]
A. N [of wind] → ráfaga f, racha f
B. VIsoplar racheado
the wind gusted up to 120km/hel viento soplaba en rachas de hasta 120km/h

gust

[ˈgʌst]
n
[wind] → rafale f
[smoke] → bouffée f
vi [wind] → souffler en rafales

gust

n (of wind)Stoß m, → Bö(e) f; (of rain)Böe f; (fig, of emotion) → Anfall m; a gust of cold/hot airein Schwall mkalte/heiße Luft; a gust of laughtereine Lachsalve; gusts of up to 100 km/hBöen von bis zu 100 km/h; the wind was blowing in gustsder Wind wehte böig or stürmisch

gust

[gʌst] n (of wind) → folata; (stronger) → raffica; (of rain) → scroscio; (of smoke) → sbuffo; (of laughter) → scoppio

gust

(gast) noun
a sudden blast (of wind). gusts of wind of up to eighty kilometres an hour.
ˈgusty adjective
a gusty day.
ˈgustily adverb
ˈgustiness noun

gust

هَبَّة poryv vindstød Windstoß ριπή ανέμου ráfaga puuska bourrasque nalet folata 突風 돌풍 windvlaag vindkast poryw rajada de vento порыв vindil ลมแรงพัดกะทันหัน ani rüzgar cơn gió mạnh đột ngột 阵风
References in classic literature ?
The weather had changed back, a great wind was abroad, and beneath the lamp, in my room, with Flora at peace beside me, I sat for a long time before a blank sheet of paper and listened to the lash of the rain and the batter of the gusts.
The sun was shining and a little wind was blowing--not a rough wind, but one which came in delightful little gusts and brought a fresh scent of newly turned earth with it.
Dreary, chill November was howling out of doors, and vexing the atmosphere with sudden showers of wintry rain, or sometimes with gusts of snow, that rattled like small pebbles against the windows.
Each delay filled him with hope, for it became more and more probable that Fogg would be obliged to remain some days at Hong Kong; and now the heavens themselves became his allies, with the gusts and squalls.
The midnight airs and gusts, moaning amongst the tightly-wrapped buds and bark of the winter twigs, were formulae of bitter reproach.
A sullen pause of the storm, which now rose and sank in gusts, produced a momentary stillness.
Thank you, steward, thank you, my friend," the Ancient Mariner murmured in the first lull between the gusts.
The water was rising higher and higher, and the gusts, forerunners of a steady breeze, were growing stiffer and stiffer.
He remained there, his ear in the cowl of the ventilator, his eyes fastened on those menacing sidelights dancing on the gusts of wind which swept the angry darkness of the sea.
Jukes, at his elbow, made himself heard yelling cheerily in the gusts, "We must have got the worst of it at once, sir.
Here, in a little cove, lay a small schooner, the Cowrie, whose decks had but a few days since run red with the blood of her officers and the loyal members of her crew, for the Cowrie had fallen upon bad days when it had shipped such men as Gust and Momulla the Maori and that arch-fiend Kai Shang of Fachan.
And the rest would be lost to me in a stormy gust of wind.