gutter


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Related to gutter: Rain gutter

gut·ter

 (gŭt′ər)
n.
1. A channel at the edge of a street or road for carrying off surface water.
2. A trough fixed under or along the eaves for draining rainwater from a roof. Also called regionally eaves trough, rainspout, spouting.
3. A furrow or groove formed by running water.
4. A trough or channel for carrying something off, such as that on either side of a bowling alley or that almost level with the water in some swimming pools.
5. Printing The white space formed by the inner margins of two facing pages, as of a book.
6. A degraded and squalid class or state of human existence.
v. gut·tered, gut·ter·ing, gut·ters
v.tr.
1. To form gutters or furrows in: Heavy rain guttered the hillside.
2. To provide with gutters.
v.intr.
1. To flow in channels or rivulets: Rainwater guttered along the curb.
2. To melt away through the side of the hollow formed by a burning wick. Used of a candle.
3. To burn low and unsteadily; flicker: The flame guttered in the lamp.
adj.
Vulgar, sordid, or unprincipled: gutter language; the gutter press.

[Middle English goter, guter, from Old French gotier, from gote, drop, from Latin gutta.]
Our Living Language Certain household words have proved important as markers for major US dialect boundaries. The channels along the edge of a roof for carrying away rainwater (normally referred to in the plural) are variously known as eaves troughs in parts of New England, the Great Lakes states, and the West; spouting or rainspouts in eastern Pennsylvania and the Delmarva Peninsula; and gutters from Virginia southward. Historically, along the Atlantic coast, the transition points have marked unusually clear boundaries for the three major dialect areas—Northern, Midland, and Southern—traditionally acknowledged by scholars of American dialects. Nowadays, however, Southern gutters has become widely established as the standard US term. See Note at andiron

gutter

(ˈɡʌtə)
n
1. (Building) a channel along the eaves or on the roof of a building, used to collect and carry away rainwater
2. (Civil Engineering) a channel running along the kerb or the centre of a road to collect and carry away rainwater
3. (Civil Engineering) a trench running beside a canal lined with clay puddle
4. (Bowls & Bowling) either of the two channels running parallel to a tenpin bowling lane
5. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing
a. the space between two pages in a forme
b. the white space between the facing pages of an open book
c. the space between two columns of type
6. (Philately) the space left between stamps on a sheet in order to separate them
7. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) surfing a dangerous deep channel formed by currents and waves
8. (Mining & Quarrying) Austral (in gold-mining) the channel of a former watercourse that is now a vein of gold
9. the gutter a poverty-stricken, degraded, or criminal environment
vb
10. (tr) to make gutters in
11. (intr) to flow in a stream or rivulet
12. (intr) (of a candle) to melt away by the wax forming channels and running down in drops
13. (intr) (of a flame) to flicker and be about to go out
[C13: from Anglo-French goutiere, from Old French goute a drop, from Latin gutta]
ˈgutter-ˌlike adj

gut•ter

(ˈgʌt ər)

n.
1. a channel at the side or in the middle of a road, for leading off surface water.
2. a channel at the eaves or on the roof of a building, for carrying off rain water.
3. any channel, trough, or furrow for carrying off fluid.
4. the sunken channel along either side of a bowling alley.
5. the state or abode of those who live in degradation, squalor, etc.: rose from the gutter to a position of prominence.
6. the white space formed by the inner margins of two facing pages in a bound book, magazine, or newspaper.
v.i.
7. to flow in streams.
8. (of a candle) to lose molten wax accumulated in a hollow space around the wick.
9. (of a lamp or candle flame) to burn low or to be blown so as to be nearly extinguished.
10. to form gutters, as water does.
v.t.
11. to make gutters in; channel.
12. to furnish with a gutter or gutters.
[1250–1300; Middle English gutter, goter < Anglo-French goutiere derivative of goutte drop (see gout)]
gut′ter•like`, adj.

gutter


Past participle: guttered
Gerund: guttering

Imperative
gutter
gutter
Present
I gutter
you gutter
he/she/it gutters
we gutter
you gutter
they gutter
Preterite
I guttered
you guttered
he/she/it guttered
we guttered
you guttered
they guttered
Present Continuous
I am guttering
you are guttering
he/she/it is guttering
we are guttering
you are guttering
they are guttering
Present Perfect
I have guttered
you have guttered
he/she/it has guttered
we have guttered
you have guttered
they have guttered
Past Continuous
I was guttering
you were guttering
he/she/it was guttering
we were guttering
you were guttering
they were guttering
Past Perfect
I had guttered
you had guttered
he/she/it had guttered
we had guttered
you had guttered
they had guttered
Future
I will gutter
you will gutter
he/she/it will gutter
we will gutter
you will gutter
they will gutter
Future Perfect
I will have guttered
you will have guttered
he/she/it will have guttered
we will have guttered
you will have guttered
they will have guttered
Future Continuous
I will be guttering
you will be guttering
he/she/it will be guttering
we will be guttering
you will be guttering
they will be guttering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been guttering
you have been guttering
he/she/it has been guttering
we have been guttering
you have been guttering
they have been guttering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been guttering
you will have been guttering
he/she/it will have been guttering
we will have been guttering
you will have been guttering
they will have been guttering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been guttering
you had been guttering
he/she/it had been guttering
we had been guttering
you had been guttering
they had been guttering
Conditional
I would gutter
you would gutter
he/she/it would gutter
we would gutter
you would gutter
they would gutter
Past Conditional
I would have guttered
you would have guttered
he/she/it would have guttered
we would have guttered
you would have guttered
they would have guttered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gutter - a channel along the eaves or on the roofgutter - a channel along the eaves or on the roof; collects and carries away rainwater
channel - a passage for water (or other fluids) to flow through; "the fields were crossed with irrigation channels"; "gutters carried off the rainwater into a series of channels under the street"
slideway, sloping trough, chute, slide - sloping channel through which things can descend
cullis - a gutter in a roof
gable roof, saddle roof, saddleback roof, saddleback - a double sloping roof with a ridge and gables at each end
2.gutter - misfortune resulting in lost effort or moneygutter - misfortune resulting in lost effort or money; "his career was in the gutter"; "all that work went down the sewer"; "pensions are in the toilet"
bad luck, ill luck, tough luck, misfortune - an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes
3.gutter - a worker who guts things (fish or buildings or cars etc.)
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
4.gutter - a tool for gutting fish
hand tool - a tool used with workers' hands
Verb1.gutter - burn unsteadily, feebly, or low; flicker; "The cooling lava continued to gutter toward lower ground"
burn, glow - shine intensely, as if with heat; "The coals were glowing in the dark"; "The candles were burning"
2.gutter - flow in small streams; "Tears guttered down her face"
course, flow, run, feed - move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi"
3.gutter - wear or cut gutters into; "The heavy rain guttered the soil"
dig into, poke into, probe - examine physically with or as if with a probe; "probe an anthill"
4.gutter - provide with gutters; "gutter the buildings"
cater, ply, provide, supply - give what is desired or needed, especially support, food or sustenance; "The hostess provided lunch for all the guests"

gutter

noun drain, channel, tube, pipe, ditch, trench, trough, conduit, duct, sluice The waste washes down the gutter and into the city's sewerage system.
Translations
قَناة مائِيّة على جانِب الطَّريق
okapstrouha
tagrende
koururappiosadevesikouruvaluavirrata
esõvízcsatorna
ræsi
notekcaurule
obcestni jarekžleb
oluksefaletsuyoluyağmur oluğu

gutter

1 [ˈgʌtəʳ]
A. N (in street) → arroyo m, cuneta f, desagüe m (CAm); (on roof) → canal m, canalón m
the gutter (fig) → los barrios bajos; (= underworld) → el hampa
he rose from the gutter (fig) → salió de la nada
B. CPD the gutter press N (pej) → la prensa amarilla TABLOIDS AND BROADSHEETS

gutter

2 [ˈgʌtəʳ] VI [candle] → irse consumiendo

gutter

[ˈgʌtər] n
[roof] → gouttière f
(in street)caniveau m
to end up in the gutter → finir dans le caniveau

gutter

n (on roof) → Dachrinne f; (in street) → Gosse f (also fig), → Rinnstein m; to be born in the gutteraus der Gosse kommen; the language of the gutterdie Gassensprache
vi (candle, flame)flackern

gutter

:
gutter press
n (Brit pej) → Boulevardpresse f
guttersnipe
nGassenkind nt

gutter

[ˈgʌtəʳ] n (in street) → cunetta, scolo; (on roof) → grondaia
to rise from the gutter (fig) → venire dai bassifondi or dalla strada

gutter

(ˈgatə) noun
a channel for carrying away water, especially at the edge of a road or roof. The gutters are flooded with water.
References in classic literature ?
It was bitter cold in the morning, she dropped her precious turnover in the gutter, Aunt March had an attack of the fidgets, Meg was sensitive, Beth would look grieved and wistful when she got home, and Amy kept making remarks about people who were always talking about being good and yet wouldn't even try when other people set them a virtuous example.
Young Andrews sprang to his feet, and, with the force of a hose flushing a gutter, swept his soiled visitors into the hall.
Why, that dirty little gutter, you know, that ran along the side of the road and followed us down the hill all the way here, that cost them--let me see--yes, nearly sixty thousand dollars.
Thence, swelling over the rim of moss-grown stones, the water stole away under the fence, through what we regret to call a gutter, rather than a channel.
That man who had been sent to Jurgis' father by the boss, he would rise; the man who told tales and spied upon his fellows would rise; but the man who minded his own business and did his work--why, they would "speed him up" till they had worn him out, and then they would throw him into the gutter.
He had been drunk over in town, and laid in the gutter all night, and he was a sight to look at.
Tain't wuth savin'; tain't wuth totin' out on a shovel en throwin' en de gutter.
Noureddin letting her go, seized Saouy's horse by the bridle, and, encouraged by the applause of the bystanders, dragged him to the ground, beat him severely, and left him in the gutter streaming with blood.
What great waves there were in the gutter, and what a swift current
Until then the nose of the chevalier was ever delicate and nice; never had a damp black blotch, nor an amber drop fall from it; but now that nose, smeared with tobacco around the nostrils, degraded by the driblets which took advantage of the natural gutter placed between itself and the upper lip,--that nose, which no longer cared to seem agreeable, revealed the infinite pains which the chevalier had formerly taken with his person, and made observers comprehend, by the extent of its degradation, the greatness and persistence of the man's designs upon Mademoiselle Cormon.
He had been contented, for the convenience of the house, to lodge in the fourth story; and truth obliges us even to confess that his chamber was just above the gutter and below the roof.
This is mere gossip of the gutter and I am surprised at you, who really know nothing about it - "