habitually


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ha·bit·u·al

 (hə-bĭch′o͞o-əl)
adj.
1.
a. Done by habit: habitual lying.
b. Being so by habit: a habitual liar. See Synonyms at chronic.
2. Established by long use; usual: my habitual place. See Synonyms at usual.
3. Grammar Designating an action or state that lasts for or is repeated over an extended duration, expressed in English by such means as the simple present tense (She works downtown) and the phrase used to (A factory used to be located at that intersection).

ha·bit′u·al·ly adv.
ha·bit′u·al·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.habitually - according to habit or custom; "her habitually severe expression"; "he habitually keeps his office door closed"

habitually

adverb
In an expected or customary manner; for the most part:
Idioms: as usual, per usual.
Translations
بِصورَة عاديَّه
obvykle
megrögzötten
vanalega
iš papratimo
her zamanki gibi

habitually

[həˈbɪtjʊəlɪ] ADV (= usually) → por costumbre; (= constantly) → constantemente

habitually

[həˈbɪtʃuəli] advhabituellement
She was habitually late for work → Elle arrivait habituellement en retard au travail.
his habitually smug expression → son air habituel de suffisance

habitually

advständig; (= regularly)regelmäßig; drink, smokegewohnheitsmäßig

habitually

[həˈbɪtjʊəlɪ] advabitualmente, d'abitudine

habit

(ˈhӕbit) noun
1. something which a person does usually or regularly. the habit of going for a walk before bed; an irritating habit of interrupting.
2. a tendency to do the same things that one has always done. I did it out of habit.
3. clothes. a monk's habit.
habitual (həˈbitjuəl) adjective
1. having a habit of doing, being etc (something). He's a habitual drunkard.
2. done etc regularly. He took his habitual walk before bed.
habitually (həˈbitjuəli) adverb
from force of habit
because one is used to doing (something). I took the cigarette from force of habit.
get (someone) into the habit of, get (someone) out of the habit of
to make (a person) start or stop doing (something) as a habit. I wish I could get out of the habit of biting my nails; You must get your children into the habit of cleaning their teeth.
References in classic literature ?
People who in former years habitually called upon me and invited me--or who, in the event of my absence, habitually wrote to me at this season--have abstained with a remarkable unanimity from calling, inviting, or writing now.
Hence Quasimodo's gratitude was profound, passionate, boundless; and although the visage of his adopted father was often clouded or severe, although his speech was habitually curt, harsh, imperious, that gratitude never wavered for a single moment.
I believe there has been in England, since the days of the STUARTS, no law so often infamously administered, no law so often openly violated, no law habitually so ill-supervised.
He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.
You say that everyone is laughing at you, that every one has learnED of the bond which exists between us, and that your neighbours habitually refer to me with a sneer.
They could not believe it indeed, for they could not take in the immensity of all they habitually enjoyed, and so could not conceive that what they were destroying was the very thing they lived by.
We might have taken the case of insects visiting flowers for the sake of collecting pollen instead of nectar; and as pollen is formed for the sole object of fertilisation, its destruction appears a simple loss to the plant; yet if a little pollen were carried, at first occasionally and then habitually, by the pollen-devouring insects from flower to flower, and a cross thus effected, although nine-tenths of the pollen were destroyed, it might still be a great gain to the plant; and those individuals which produced more and more pollen, and had larger and larger anthers, would be selected.
So, almost every twenty-four hours, when the watches of the night were set, and the band on deck sentinelled the slumbers of the band below; and when if a rope was to be hauled upon the forecastle, the sailors flung it not rudely down, as by day, but with some cautiousness dropt it to its place, for fear of disturbing their slumbering shipmates; when this sort of steady quietude would begin to prevail, habitually, the silent steersman would watch the cabin-scuttle; and ere long the old man would emerge, griping at the iron banister, to help his crippled way.
If in training soldiers commands are habitually enforced, the army will be well-disciplined; if not, its discipline will be bad.
And, fool that I was, when they misjudged me, I indulged them on that account more than myself, being habitually hard on myself, and often even taking revenge on myself for the indulgence.
Never, on any previous occasion, had he practiced more successfully the social art which he habitually cultivated -- the art of casting himself on society in the character of a well-bred Incubus, and conferring an obligation on his fellow-creatures by allowing them to sit under him.
An ill-made, high-shouldered man, with lowering brows, and his features crushed into an habitually sour expression, he contrasted most unfavourably, even in his mongrel dress, with the great body of his hearers in their plain working clothes.